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John

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41

Friday, April 21st 2006, 2:20pm

RE: The Model to Date

Three...


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42

Friday, April 21st 2006, 2:21pm

RE: The Model to Date

Four...


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43

Friday, April 21st 2006, 2:25pm

RE: The Model to Date

And this fifth shot shows the open tab edges of the rising ground awaiting attachment to the fortress portion of the model. As you can see, although the scale is small, (1:300) the model spreads out over a large area. The work so far has just created the approaches to the fortress. The pathway you see coming up in the middle between the buildings joins onto a stone bridge leading to the fortress gatehouse.

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "John" (Apr 28th 2006, 12:15pm)


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44

Saturday, April 22nd 2006, 1:05am

Inside/Outside Tabs

There are a number of arcades on this model. Credit goes to Ricleite for showing me how the tabs on the sidewalls of such arched recesses can be cut. I pass his technique along here. It works very well.

On the back edge of the sidewall, the tabs that wrap around the recess have to be cut as indicated on most printed parts - triangular. This prevents the tabs from binding and overlapping each other as they curve around the arch. But at the front of the arch where the sidewall is fastened, only slits need be cut. The tabs on the sidewall will flare out, like spreading toes, as the part is curved around the arch. Thanks Ricleite. A much easier method.
John has attached the following image:
  • Inside:Outside Tabs.jpg

This post has been edited 4 times, last edit by "John" (Apr 28th 2006, 2:50am)


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45

Saturday, April 22nd 2006, 5:37pm

That is such a nice tip. I remember finding out something like that when making support strips for the Comet stab & fin. You had to cut them slightly differently depending on whether the curve was concave or convex. I got it from an old JSC kit, and I do think it is a most worthwhile method with many applications.

Leif
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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46

Saturday, April 22nd 2006, 6:44pm

Hi Leif,
I agree. I like your convex/concave terminology.
Here are two long blind arcades.
John has attached the following image:
  • Arches.jpg

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "John" (Jun 30th 2006, 1:34pm)


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47

Wednesday, April 26th 2006, 9:59am

Hi John,

You know, making life easier is one of my favourite tasks :D
Regarding Betexa kits, I know them only by pictures and they still puzzle me. The stated number of parts looks far below the apparent number when looking at finished models! Are they afraid to scare off potential buyers? For me, it is rather the opposite =). I became interested in St. Vitus after reading, in this site, that the model has over 400 parts...
For Pernstein, I bought the Erkotyp kit and, obviously, will not build the Betexa one. Despite having around 400 parts, I found the Erkotyp kit much less demanding than the average. Just a fraction of the castle, a flat base and no recessed windows or doors :(
Needless to say, I'll follow this thread closely ;)

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48

Wednesday, April 26th 2006, 3:48pm

Betexa Models

Hi Ricleite,
You would enjoy St. Vitus. Challenging. It's intended to be built in reverse - from the top down.

I have a love/hate relationship with Pernstein right now. As you can see from my postings here, I have issues with it. Its challenges however, keep moving me forward. It is built on three rising levels. Interestingly enough not one level is supported from below. The first layer rests on its surrounding ramparts.

It closely follows the real thing. I viewed at photo of the central bastian taken by M. Schembera and linked to this thread by Redak:

http://www.feudum.cz/gallery.php?akce=ob…kaz&media_id=11

The model is dead on with this photo, right down to the corbels under the oriels, bays and elevated passageways.

John

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "John" (Apr 26th 2006, 3:50pm)


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49

Thursday, April 27th 2006, 2:18am

Quoted

Original von Ricleite
Hi John,

. I became interested in St. Vitus after reading


St. Vitus is a must! Very convincing!
Kartonbau.de dein Forum!
Kartonbau.de It's Yours!
Kartonbau.de Jouw Forum!

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50

Thursday, April 27th 2006, 3:55am

Yes, St. Vitus is a nice departure in some details from the French gothics.
John has attached the following image:
  • St. Vitus.jpg

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51

Friday, April 28th 2006, 12:00am

The Fortress

This lonely gatehouse tower will become the main entrance to the fortress. A stone bridge will lead to its entrance tunnel.
John has attached the following image:
  • Entrance Tower.jpg

This post has been edited 5 times, last edit by "John" (Apr 28th 2006, 12:20pm)


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52

Friday, April 28th 2006, 12:04am

RE: The Fortress

Here is the interior view of that tower. Its tunnel is under construction.

Note the printing. I don't know why Betexa prints the history of the castle on the back of parts that will be cut up. Printing on a separate information sheet would seem to make more sense. This way, the back of the cardstock has to be photocopied before assembly.

I guess you could say that the history is in the castle.
John has attached the following image:
  • Tunnel Walls.jpg

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "John" (Apr 28th 2006, 1:36am)


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53

Friday, April 28th 2006, 12:05am

RE: The Fortress

And here is the interior facade of the tunnel wall completed.
John has attached the following image:
  • Inner Wall.jpg

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54

Friday, April 28th 2006, 12:12am

RE: The Fortress

Here are three shots of the fortress block.
One...



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55

Friday, April 28th 2006, 12:13am

RE: The Fortress

Two...

Notice the little covered elevated passageway going nowhere. The open central area will be the main bastian of the fort. The entrance will be on the left through the gatehouse.

This post has been edited 3 times, last edit by "John" (Apr 28th 2006, 1:38am)


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56

Friday, April 28th 2006, 12:15am

RE: The Fortress

Three...


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57

Friday, April 28th 2006, 12:32am

Hi John,

To print the history of a bilding on the back of the paper modell is real strange !!!

That means to hide the his(story) of the building inside of the walls of the castle. :( :( :(

Is this the intent of the editor?! ?( ?( ?(

An assumtion only, -- I can´t belive it. ;)

Fact is, your work is worth to follow it.

Regards, Herbert

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58

Friday, April 28th 2006, 2:20am

Thanks Herbert,
Here's that stone bridge. Its ramp will join to the first and second parts of the model.
John has attached the following image:
  • Stone Bridge.jpg

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59

Saturday, April 29th 2006, 3:26pm

Bastian Wall

One wall of the main fortress is in place. It is quite detailed. There are 8 oriels, two galleries, a balcony and covered passageway all supported from below with 44 corbels. Including all the other details, a total of 65 parts. Not bad for one wall section.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "John" (Apr 29th 2006, 3:27pm)


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60

Saturday, April 29th 2006, 4:26pm

Hi John,

Scale is 1:300. What is the dimension of the complete castle? (in scale 1:300)

Today I watch the pictures on the links radek did send you about this castle, and I´ve got the impression that this castle is not a very small one!!

Greetings from Vienna, Herbert

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61

Saturday, April 29th 2006, 4:49pm

Castle Size

Hi Herbert,
The approaches to the gatehouse on this model are 44 cm long. Then the castle splits like the letter 'Y'. Two arms spread out from the core. The base I have made for the castle is 74cm x 54 cm and I fear I may have made it too small! We'll see.

What really drew me to this model were the elevations. You can envision yourself as a tourist, walking up the rising pathway to the castle with much anticipation. You pass interesting buildings and subtle fortifications along the way.
John

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "John" (Apr 29th 2006, 8:09pm)


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62

Saturday, April 29th 2006, 5:13pm

Thank´s John,

Then it is BIG.

The biggest castle I did build was the castle Eltz from Schreiber.

Unfortunately this modell does not exists any more.

But I do remeber that it was a "space problem" model in my apartment. ;) ;) ;)

Herbert

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Micro" (Apr 29th 2006, 5:13pm)


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63

Saturday, April 29th 2006, 8:20pm

I know what you mean...
John has attached the following image:
  • Eltz.jpg

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "John" (Apr 29th 2006, 8:21pm)


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64

Sunday, April 30th 2006, 12:07am

Hi John,

You build castle Eltz also, did you? Nice!!

A picture of castle Eltz was on the 500 D-Mark. Now this is history.

One additional question. Are all this paper modells easy to buy in canada?

To know somebody who build Schreiber - Papermodell in Canada showes me that the world is very small.

Kind regards, Herbert

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65

Sunday, April 30th 2006, 11:03am

Paper Models in Canada

Hi Herbert.
Thanks. There is a paper model distributor right here in my own province of Ontario. You may have heard of Lighthouse Model Art. It is run by Ralf E. Schnurbusch. Its website is:

http://www.lighthousemodelart.com/

Ralph has a large listing of ships, airplanes, trains, buildings and vechicles from all over the world as well as model supplies. He also features on his site, an international electronic cardmodel newsletter.

I must say that cardmodelling does not yet have the following enjoyed in Europe. I think Ralph is the only supplier in Ontario. There are a couple of suppliers out West.

Greetings from Ontario, Canada!

Cheers...John

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66

Monday, May 1st 2006, 12:45am

Avoiding Lap Joints

There are a lot of joints in the courtyard sections around this castle. They are designed as overlap joints where one piece has a white tab. It is glued under the mating piece. Unfortunately this creates an unsightly lap joint, where the seam is elevated and exposed. The eye notices this ridge.

A simple technique is to cut off the tab! Reglue it under the part with only a little bit underlapping. Now you have a step for the other mating part to slide home and close the seam.
John has attached the following images:
  • Tab.jpg
  • Glued on Back.jpg
  • Mating.jpg

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67

Monday, May 1st 2006, 12:48am

RE: Avoiding Lap Joints

Here you see a dry fit of the joint. No retouching yet, no glue and yet the joint has closed fairly well. The seam will be flat and almost inperceptable.
John has attached the following image:
  • Flat Seam.jpg

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68

Tuesday, May 2nd 2006, 1:01am

Different Elevations

From the exterior, this building looks as though its height is uniform throughout.
John has attached the following image:
  • Exterior.jpg

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69

Tuesday, May 2nd 2006, 1:04am

RE: Different Elevations

On the interior, however, the building stops short at a courtyard. These supports hold the building plumb and will keep it from sagging under the weight of the inner couryard and its associated buildings.
John has attached the following image:
  • Interior Support.jpg

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70

Tuesday, May 2nd 2006, 1:06am

RE: Different Elevations

The interior walls and roof...
John has attached the following image:
  • Building.jpg

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71

Tuesday, May 2nd 2006, 1:07am

RE: Different Elevations

...and the interior courtyard.
John has attached the following image:
  • Interior Courtyard.jpg

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72

Tuesday, May 2nd 2006, 2:47pm

@ Micro - I also understand you, in what regards space at home ;)

John, I see a substantial amount of card in this model. Is it part of the kit or part of your build, to fix shape and add strength? If I remember well, that was not needed in Eltz Castle, which had an interesting 'top to bottom' build method.
Ricleite has attached the following images:
  • Eltz-T1.jpg
  • Eltz-I1.jpg

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73

Tuesday, May 2nd 2006, 10:24pm

Sorry John, that we use your thread to send pictures from another building.

BUT castle Elz is a rearly beautyfull one:

greetings from Vieanna, Herbert
Micro has attached the following image:
  • BurgEltz0902g.jpg

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Micro" (May 2nd 2006, 10:24pm)


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74

Sunday, May 7th 2006, 12:33am

Hi Micro,
Not to worry. Sharing information about great structures is what this panel is all about.

Hello Ricleite,
Yes, a significant amount of card is used in this model to stabilize the buildings and keep them plumb. They are not designed to carry on down to a base, but rather 'hang' in the air awaiting attachment to other parts. The thread of this build has attempted to illustrate this modification from page 1.

John

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75

Thursday, May 11th 2006, 12:35pm

Roofs

I am very impressed with the fit of the many complex rooflines involved here. They were a puzzle.

Notice the building directly to the right of the tower. Its wall was printed and attached to the tower wall and took quite a bit of time to figure out how it was to be folded. After leaving the tower, the wall travels a short distance and then turns an inside corner. But it does not continue down the side wall. This was the confusing part. Instead, it turns back on itself and returns to the tower - closing to create a deep, narrow enclosure with a courtyard at the bottom. It was another small piece that continued the side wall along - picking up from where the first part broke away to fold back toward the tower. Tricky.

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "John" (May 11th 2006, 2:09pm)


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76

Thursday, May 11th 2006, 12:44pm

RE: Roofs

Another angle...

Another confusing fold was the 'V' shape you see in the wall that returns to the tower. This will accomodate a valley fold in the roof. Imagine the framing angles of the timbers in these roofs!

This post has been edited 3 times, last edit by "John" (May 17th 2006, 12:55pm)


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77

Thursday, May 11th 2006, 3:37pm

Comparison

Here's a whimsical shot. In the background is the picture of tourists approaching the entrance to the castle. Held in front of the picture is the model of the exact same location. Out of focus in the foreground, but you certainly can see how faithful the model is to the actual structure.
John has attached the following image:
  • Comparison.jpg

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78

Thursday, May 11th 2006, 9:16pm

The exterior walls of the fortress are festooned with oriels - all of which are supported from below with corbelling.
John has attached the following image:
  • The Other Side.jpg

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79

Friday, May 12th 2006, 2:33am

Inside

The bastian is closed. The last bit of wall was left out so that fingers of one hand could reach in and help the hand coming up from the bottom of the model glue the many tabs of the roofs in place.
This picutre is shot up into the inside of the bastian. You can see the long slender courtyard hanging near the center as well as bits of reinforcement here and there.
John has attached the following image:
  • Inside.jpg

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80

Friday, May 12th 2006, 2:44am

Rooflines

From the outside...
John has attached the following image:
  • Roofs2.jpg

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "John" (May 12th 2006, 2:45am)


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