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Leif Ohlsson

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Sunday, January 21st 2007, 12:46am

Thomas Flyabout 1909 in 1:87 scale

Roman Seissler, on his paperwarbirds download page, features a link to a Russian freeware download of the Thomas Flyabout 1909 car. The scale is said to be 1:32. Now, there are several problems with this, as I discovered when attempting to download it. (I describe some of them in a more technical note below.)

However, I eventually succeeded in downloading, rescaling, and rearranging the parts, plus the instructions into a 1:87 version of the same quality as the original.

As you can see below, the model is entirely handdrawn (and painted as well), and very intricate. I doubt that those wishing to attempt the model in this scale will use all the small tabs, but of course I left them in, since they are easy to omit when cutting out the parts.

What would have been almost impossibly difficult is to cut out the parts from the downscaled originals - they were positioned so tightly that a knife wouldn't have been able to cut between them cleanly enough without damaging one or the other part.

As an illustration I attach an image of what the four original downloadable parts look like when you glue them into a single sheet. (From the original source you can download the two parts sheets, one large image of the instructions, and a drawing of what the finished model will look like.)

These are all included in the 1:87 version below. But notice the difference after separating the parts (and enlarging the instructions)!

Also included in the present 1:87 pdf are some extra copies of wheel parts, for those who would like to make solid wheels, instead of built up ones.

Note: The original download surprisingly is 300 dpi - but clearly not in a scale of 1:32 as downloaded. Some experimenting led me to believe that the original probably is made to print "fit to size", and that a reasonable resolution for that would be somewhere very close 150 dpi (which is also a conveniently round and probable figure).

Taking that as the probable 1:32 scale, a quick calculation gave an equally round and convenient figure of 400 dpi as getting sufficiently close to 1:87, so I settled for that. The download you get thus is made in 400 dpi, and jpg-compressed at maximum quality (instead of zip compression, which is what I usually use to get maximum quality; in this case, however, using that method resulted in exceeding the maximum limit for uploads, du to the 400 dpi resolution instead of my usual 300 dpi).

A final tip: If you download the original from the Russian site I suggest you call up each sheet and image in a browser window. That way you can always just "reload" it when the browser loses contact, without losing the section you have succefully downloaded when the connection is broken. I found this to be the only way to download the model, and I had to reload each sheet, and image, several times to finally get them onto my computer.

Photo source for the two beautifully restored Thomas Flyabouts is the Concept Carz site, here and here. (And there are many more to be found there.)
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Thomas_Flyabout-187.jpg
  • Thomas_original-dwnld.jpg
  • Thomas-4.jpg
  • Thomas-2.jpg
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Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

Gil Russell

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Sunday, January 21st 2007, 4:10am

Good Grief Leif!

Leif,

You sorely tempt me! This is too much to pass up and I'll just have to build it. Thank you for all your kind work and thinking about the rest of us...,

Respectfully, -Gil
I got carded!

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Sunday, January 21st 2007, 4:11am

Dear Leif,

Thank you for the nice car model! Seems like you keep on going building a whole collection of models in 1/87. Roman has also a very nich oldtimer truck of his own design on his page once posted here in the forum. And certainly there are more nice free cars out there to scale to 1/87...

Thanks again,

Matthias

Leif Ohlsson

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Sunday, January 21st 2007, 2:19pm

Problem areas?

Glad to hear I could tempt you, Gil! And thanks Matthias - I am eagerly waiting for Roman to bring out his 1:100 version of the truck; that will be something to scale to 1:87 (the large-scale version I deem to be too complicated to build in a scaled-down version).

When I was googling for photos of the Thomas Flyer, or Flyabout, I came upon this thread at our own forum by Sepp (Josef Mayer), who requested photos to guide him building the Thomas Flyabout in 1:250 scale (sic!). He was uncertain about what the rear end really looked like, and how to build it.

I've tried to figure out what the problem might be, and here's what I understand (see illustration).

At the rear end there is a luggage rack (to tie up passenger knapsacks under a tarpaulin, presumably). This could obviously be folded up (see photo in the sketch). In the model it is built in the down, horizontal, position, and simulated by doubling up the rear end of the chassis part 11 on itself, and then cutting out the areas marked with red crosses.

Other parts that go on here are the registration plate (59) at the bottom, and a fairing (31) at the top and the end of the passenger compartment.

What could possibly cause consternation (I for one had to think twice about them) are the three squares marked 11, since they have the same part number as the main chassis. I think these are just spare parts (colour samples), to be used for reinforcement if needed, and at the builder's discretion. (One has to remember that the original was probably published in a magazine, which would account for the lack of space - the designer just had to get everything into two pages.)
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following image:
  • Problemareas.jpg
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somehow

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Wednesday, January 24th 2007, 2:51pm

My first downscaled model

Hi there, hello Leif,
with the help of Jan Müller it came to a good end, and I can share my first downscaled model,
its a free download from

www.ymjr.cz

a Porsche935.
I only rescaled it, nothing else, so the writing on the botom is still 1:43, even when its now 1:87, have fun.



Hi ihr, hallo Leif
mit der Hilfe von Jan Müller schaften wir es endlich, dass ich euch mein erstes runterscaliertes Modell zeigen kann,
es ist ein freier download von


www.ymjr.cz

ein 935ger Porsche
Ich habe nur den Maßstab geändert, sonst nichts, auf dem Boden steht immernoch 1:43, auch wenn es jetzt 1:87 in 1:87 ist, viel Spass.


Holger
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This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "somehow" (Jan 24th 2007, 9:52pm)


somehow

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Wednesday, January 24th 2007, 4:25pm

Porsche935 1zu87

Printed it looks like this, but download the PDF for building


Gedruckt sieht das so aus, aber ladet zun bauen die PDF runter
somehow has attached the following image:
  • RIMG0003.jpg

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "somehow" (Jan 24th 2007, 9:54pm)


Leif Ohlsson

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Saturday, January 27th 2007, 1:38pm

Recolouring tutorial now in German - and a new one

Thanks, Holger, for uploading your rescaled freeware Porsche, so that we can all enjoy it!

Thanks also for translating the quick tutorial on how to recolour a model like the Piper Family Cruiser. The German translation has now been added to that post earlier in the thread.

Holger tells me he has just got a version of Photoshop, and we've had some correspondence on how to best proceed making new rescaled versions of existing models, available as freeware.

I have tried to demonstrate the process step by step in this separate thread in the "How to do the right thing" section. Hopefully, it will encourage others to share their work on models which can be legitimately shared this way. (Of course, it is alway polite and good form to write to the author and get his blessing!)
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

Leif Ohlsson

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Saturday, January 27th 2007, 1:41pm

Early ultralight Messerschmitt M-33 rescaled to 1:87

The subject for the exercise in rescaling a downloaded PDF model in Photoshop was a suberb model by a German author, of a German early prototype for what today would be an ultralight - namely the Messerschmitt M-33, modeled in 1:33 scale by Elger Esterle. See and download the orignal model at Elger's own website.

The most fascinating aspect of this model is that the full-size aircraft ever only existed as a model, or a mockup, at an exhibition in 1932. The economic depression and then the war put a stop to further development.

The only photo of that 1:1 mockup I have been able to find is reproduced below, together with Elger's own build of his 1:33 model.
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • M33-1932-mockup.jpg
  • M33-133-model.jpg
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Saturday, January 27th 2007, 1:47pm

And here's the final version to download and enjoy!

Have you read the tutorial yet? Here's what came out of it in the end for me.

I'm proud that Elger Esterle, the designer, very kindly has given his blessing to this exercise. Many thanks, Elger!

What you get here is all the original parts in the 1:33 version rescaled to 1:87, and slightly rearranged for clarity. If you set about building this very small aircraft in the small 1:87 scale, no doubt you will come up with various substitutions for the small parts.

The main text about the history of the aircraft, as well as all instruction notes among the parts, are the author's original. I have just added two more photos, plus a few notes on dimensions in the rescaled version.

Thanks to Holger, who kindly stepped in and translated my own few comments into German, this will be my first all-German offer of a rescaled freeware download model.
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following image:
  • M33-187-download.jpg
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following file:
  • M33-187.pdf (3.95 MB - 285 times downloaded - latest: Jul 24th 2018, 7:04pm)
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Sunday, February 4th 2007, 2:44pm

Correct paper thickness in 1:87

When you scale a regular kit in, let's say 1:33 scale, to 1:87 you reduce it to approximately 40 percent (37,9 more exactly) of its original size. If your original is really sophisticated and designed to close tolerances (like for exampel Halinski models) paper thickness does play a role to achieve a good fit, also when scaled down.

In fact, it becomes more important since, if you use regular thickness paper in smaller scale, it will be proportionally much thicker than in the original scale. So what paper thickness should one use for the different parts?

In a normal kit you will get originals in two paper thickness, one thin, and one regular. Parts on both paper sizes might also be doubled on to thicker card of many kinds ("bristol", 0,5mm, 1mm).

The result of this is that you may face at least eight different paper sizes in the original. What paper thickness should I use for these when scaled to 1:87?

Here is my short answer to that question (and afterwards I'll explain how I arrived at that):

@-parts (roll-up parts on thin paper): Print on 45g sketching paper, also called "vellum" in English.

Regular parts: Print on 100g paper, and make second copy on 160g. Use whatever thickness feels best for each part (160 g for outer skins, 100g for joining strips, fairings, and small details).

"+"-parts (to be doubled on to "Bristol" or "Tonpapier"): Print directly on 160g paper.

"X"-part (to be doubled on to 0.5mm): Print directly on 225g paper, or - even better - on 270g paper.

"XX"-parts (to be doubled on to 1.mm): Print directly on 225g paper and double with another layer of 225g. Or better, print directly on 270g paper and double with 160g paper.

As you can see, I have reduced the eight possible categories in an ordinary kit to five standard kinds in 1:87. And you don't have to double anything up at all, except for the thickest parts, and here you double two sheets of equal thickness, which is much easier (less risk of bending and distortion).

Note that in each case in 1:87 we are not talking about printing on one kind of paper and doubling on to different sizes, but printing directly on different thickness of paper (except for the last case, doubling the "XX-parts").

For this to be rational, you have to separate parts on to different originals already in the computer. Since you are already halfway into this once you start rescaling a kit, this is not a large step. But I'll go into that in more detail in a posting to follow. This is just for remembering the basic principles and paper thicknesses.

Calculations: Here's how I arrived at the five standard categories:

In original kits the respective paper thicknesses are:

Thin paper 0.10mm
Regular paper 0.20mm

And the thicknesses of doubling up papers are:

"Bristol" or "Tonpapier" 0.25mm
Card 0.5mm
Card 1.0mm

Which gives us eight possible alternatives:

Thin paper alone (roll-up parts): 0.10mm. In 1:87 this would amount to 0.04mm. Sketching paper is 0.05mm, which is close enough to make me happy.

Thin paper on "Bristol": 0.10 + 0.25 = 0.35mm. In 1:87 this would become 0.14mm, so 160g paper (0.15mm) is a given choice.

Thin paper on 0.5mm: 0.10 + 0.50 = 0.60mm. In 1:87 this is 0.24mm, so 225g paper (0.25mm) is excellent, and 270g (0.30mm) quite satisfactory.

Thin paper on 1.0mm: 0.10 + 1.00 = 1.10mm. In 1:87 this is 0.44mm. I'll settle for two layers of 225g (0.50mm), or even better one layer of 270g, doubled with one layer of 160g (0.30 + 0.15 = 0.45mm).

Regular paper alone: 0.20 mm. In 1:87 this is 0.08mm. Well, 100g paper at 0.12mm is how thin I dare go, and I would still like to be able to use 160g at 0.15mm for rigidity wherever possible. That is why I recommend printing two copies of these parts, one on 100g, and one on 160g, so you can cut parts at the thickness you feel comfortable with for each part.

Regular paper on "Bristol": 0.20 + 0.25 = 0.45mm. In 1:87 this is 0.18mm. I'll settle for 160g (0.15mm), particularly since this makes it the same as thin paper on Bristol.

Regular paper on 0.5mm card: 0.20 + 0.50 = 0.70mm. In 1:87 this is 0.28mm. I'll be quite happy with 225g (0.25mm), , and even happier with 270g paper (0.30mm), which makes it the same as thin paper on 0.5mm card.

Regular paper on 1.0mm card: 0.20 + 1.00 = 1.20mm. In 1:87 this is 0.48mm. Two layers of 225g (0.50mm) is excellent, and so is one layer of 270g doubled with one layer of 160g (0.30 + 0.15 = 0.45mm), which makes it the same category as thin paper on 1mm card.

Leif
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Leif Ohlsson

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Sunday, February 4th 2007, 7:35pm

Using postcard size originals for printing in 1:87

Starting with the problem of paper thickness, I soon got to thinking about paper size. If I could six or eight original sheets into a single A4 when rescaling a kit to 1:87, and I really wanted to print them on five different kinds of paper - why stick to the good old A4 size?

More and more that seemed like a restriction. Then, searching for paper that could be used for 225g test printing, I remembered a couple of picture postcard size photo papers that had come with sets of inkjet cartridges I had bought over time.

They were size 10x15 cm (4"x6"), and as I laid them out on a regular A4 it soon became apparent that this wasn't the same thing as A6 (which in turn is a quarter of an A4).

So I quickly made up a template document which would enable printing on both A6 and 10x15 (4"x"). If you want to try it out, the canvas area (what you see on the screen) should be 9.5x14 cm. Such a document will print equally well on either A6 papers (cut from A4), or any stock of 10x15 photo paper cards you may have lying around.

Then I picked up my old reworking of the Kartonowe Model 1:48 Polikarpov I-16, scaled to 1:87. Dividing up the parts in three categories - ordinary parts, formers and bulkheads (XX-parts), plus details like landing gear struts etc, which are to be rolled up (@-parts), I soon had made my own little Polikarpov kit consisting of:

Two sheets (or cards, really) of ordinary parts, to be printed on 100g paper, plus an extra set on 160g paper.

One card to be printed on 225g paper and doubled up with another empty 225g card. Or, even better, to be printed on 270g paper and doubled up with another layer of 160g paper.

One card to be printed on 45g sketching paper. On this, I could afford to print two sets of @-parts. It is nice to have spares for these roll-up parts!

In addition, the instructions sketches fitted well into two cards, which can easily be taped to my shelves and studied while building.

And then there's the nice part I just couldn't resist - a few extras like photos, three-view drawings, detail drawings, etc, which I had collected from the internet. Not really necessary at all - but a pleasure to gloat over.

Here's what my little collection of cards for the Polikarpov I-16 looks like (and I really had to put my hand into the picture for you to realize the small size of my "sheets" - the ruler is ten cm.):
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following image:
  • Polikarpovkit.jpg
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Jan Hascher

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Sunday, February 4th 2007, 7:45pm

Hello Leif,
you always keep me amazed. If you continue to work so hard, you might get your own section. Something like "cardmodelling research" would be appropriate. Hopefully I will be able to use some of your tricks on my F-14s for the U-Boat diorama.

Cheers
Jan
Jeder, der einen Post mit "Ich habe zwar keine Ahnung, aber..." beginnt, möge bitte den Absenden-Button ignorieren.

Leif Ohlsson

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Sunday, February 4th 2007, 8:21pm

Dividing up the parts on your "picture postcards"

Thanks Jan - that was very heartwarming and encouraging!

Now, a little bit more on this theme:

Working with these litte picture postcard size new originals, and dividing the original parts up into the five different (or most often just three) categories for printing on different thickness papers, really created a whole new sense of freedom.

Suddenly space wasn't such a constriction. You could space the parts considerably more than when working on an A4. I know it sounds strange, but that's how it was for me - perhaps it has something to do with the fact that you divide the original kit up into sections that are more manageable than a whole A4, with less number of parts at a time.

This is a little bit like going back to the Fiddler's Green original idea - but without cramming the parts the way they had to do it. So what if another little picture postcard size sheet is added? - it will hardly be my ruin, nor will it take up much space on the hard drive.

Below you may study how I divided up the simple little Polikarpov model in 1:87 scale.

The first two cards contain regular thickness parts (printed on 100g, plus an extra set on 160g). Note how spacious you can make it. I imagine I'll cut the main parts (outer skin, main wing parts, etc.) from the 160g cards, while joining strips, cockpit interior, and small details will be cut from the 100g cards.

The next two cards are first of all the doubled up 225g parts (or 270g + 160g), typically formers, bulkheads, ribs, plus wheel parts. (Note that an extra set of wheel sides has been added to the 100/160g cards; this leaves me a choice if 225-270g is deemed too thick for these parts.)

Below the thick parts, there's the thin roll-up @-parts, printed on thin 45g sketching paper. There was enough space to print two sets of these on a single card.

Next two cards are the instructions. Note that the larger, see-through, side-view sketch is scaled to 1:87, which is very handy.

And then there's the four extra cards with photos, details, and three-view drawings (scaled to 1:87 of course!).

Finally, compare these cards with my original 1:87 reworking on a single A4-sheet. Not only is that so much more constrained, it will also be necessary to cut out parts one by one there and double them individually. And there's no option for thin roll-up parts at all.

I am, as you may have noticed by now, very enthusiastic about this new (for me) way of doing things!
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  •  Parts1-2.jpg
  •  Parts3-4.jpg
  •  Instr1-2.jpg
  •  Extras.jpg
  • Previous.jpg
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Tuesday, February 13th 2007, 11:32am

Using 270g paper for "X-" and "XX-" parts

I wasn't altogether happy with the 225g photo quality paper in 10x15 (4"x6") I had lying around. Renewing the supply wouldn't be cheap, and the glossy surface wasn't very nice for model building.

So I made a foraging trip to the artists shop and found large sheets of 270g paper, of the same quality as standard matt 160g paper. This can easily be cut up into standard A6 cards, which is a another bonus - it's nice to have all cards in the same size.

The 270g paper is 0.3mm thick which makes it ideal for using for "X-parts" (to be doubled on to 0.5mm card in 1:33 originals). The equivalent measure in 1:87 is (0.2 + 0.5) x 40 percent = 0.28mm, very close to 0.3 mm!

For "XX-parts" (to be doubled on to 1 mm), the equivalent measure in 1:87 is (0.2 + 1.00) x 40 percent = 0.48mm, or (0.1 + 1.0) x 0.40 = 0.44mm. The closest match is to print on 0.3mm 270g paper, and then double with 0.15mm 160g paper, which gives a thickness of 0.45mm.

I have added these options in the posts above.

Bottom line: the cheaper 270g paper will be my substitute for 225g photo-quality cards in the future.

Leif
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Tuesday, February 13th 2007, 12:19pm

Leif,

just amazing how one idea leads to the next one...

One question though: do you still actually _build_ models? :)

Michael

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Wednesday, February 14th 2007, 11:37am

Michael,

You're right, at present I don't actually build as much as many or most do. In my defence, though, the objective of these exercises - apart from showing off how clever I am - is to share the result, which is why I work on free downloads.

I have carried out the same kind of rescaling and rearranging for a couple of my own purchased models (including complicated Halinski models; haven't built them yet, though!), but it wouldn't be much of a point to show them off, since I can't very well share the result.

I want to share the Polikarpov, and intend to, but would very much like an official go ahead from Lech, of the Modele Kartonowe site. Haven't received that yet, in spite of mails and PN's. I'll wait a bit more, but then I'll publish anyhow, since it is a free download, anybody could do what I have done, the copyright still belongs to the original designer, and I'm not making any profit from it. (If this is objectionable in any way, I'd very much like to know, since then there's not much point in continuing.)

Second reason of course is encouraging others to do the same kind of experiment.

And the third is to point designers to a neater way of doing things, particularly if they publish online where the number and size of printing sheets isn't an issue (as it is if you intend to publish by commercial printing).

At the moment I'd like to go back to several of the freeware models I've demonstrated and rearrange them on to cards of different paper thickness and quality, and then share them here. I find this kind of work as satisfying as building - and there's always the justification that others can share the fruit of it.

I regard this kind of work as similar to that of an editor, trying to find the best way of presenting the effort of the author/designer. (And, of course, in every editor lives a frustrated author/designer - designing in 3D or otherwise seems to be beyond me.)

Another reason why I haven't been building very much lately is that I'd like to systematically sort out some key problem areas of building in small scales. A few of them are:

+ Paper thickness (skins should preferably be thicker, fairings, joining strips, and small details thinner). Dealt with that above, and I'm quite pleased with the result.

+ Framework. You really should get rid of tabs and slots in these small scales. Have improved on that in the Polikarpov (after demonstrating it above; improvements will be included in the download eventually). I hope to show the value of it for some other models, like Jan Müller's Slingsby, at some stage down the road.

+ Small details (which abound in Halinski and other advanced models). Have a few ideas on how you can "glue" them in place already in the computer, and use 3D effects for enhancing them. Have tried that on the more detailed Modele Kartonowe Polikarpov (scaled from 1:33 to 1:87), and will show the result as soon as Lech gets back to me.

+ 3D-enhancing. Details, but also fabric covered wings, etc. A feature mostly missing from many models, but it would seem to be particularly effective in small scales.

+ Recolouring. As you have pointed out yourself somewhere, smaller scales need lighter nuances of colour to give a correct perception.

+ Canopies. I'd like to stay away from blown canopies, since that is probably a major stumbling block for most newcomers, and I'm kind of hesitant about them myself. At present I am thinking about using clear tape, two layers, one on each side of the frame.

+ Landing gear and struts. They tend to be very clumsy in small scales, and some work is called for on wire sizes, paper thickness for rolling parts, etc. Hope to get back to that soon, too. The first step is to use sketching paper for rolled parts (see posts immediately above on paper thickness).

+ Rigging wires. Josef Mayer's tips in his "Feldflugplatz" thread are invaluable and should work even better in 1:87, three times larger scale than his 1:250 nano-scale.

+ Engine replicas, particularly radial engines. I have a few ideas for simple but effective replicas, and hope to be able to show them soon. This will enable building multi-engined aircraft, like the DC3, B24, B17, and lots of others.

+ Propeller mountings. I am actually working on a little something, and I'd like to share that soon if it works out.

+ Motorization. The next step. Pager motors are very nice, and I hope to be able to demonstrate how to use them eventually.

+ Pilot and crew figures. That was one of the main reasons to start this thread on 1:87, the abundance of commercial (plastic) accessories. But it would be nice to be able to replicate these in paper in an acceptable quality. Did some work on that (previously reported in this thread), but I want to do some more.

Thanks for prodding me to think about what I am doing! (And sorry for the lengthy reply...)

Kind regards, Leif
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

Leif Ohlsson

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Thursday, February 15th 2007, 10:37am

Rotating props in small scales, part I

I have always disliked the idea of just sticking a pin through the prop and then into the engine or other part of the model. There's always the risk of the propeller being so thin that it will wobble, and then the pinhead itself is kind of large and noticeable in small scales.

Much better, I have thought, to manufacture a unit where the rotating prop is already attached to an axis and a casing, and then stick that entire unit into a hole in the model.

The idea, thus, is to stick a pin through a small plastic tube, glue the prop to that axis, check that the glued up unit rotates freely and well aligned, and then shove the whole thing into the finished model.

Here's my first attempt (evaluation follows in the next post):

1. For both casing and prop hub I chose RC control rod inner tubing of 2mm outer diameter. The axis will be an ordinary pin, cut off at suitable length. Here I am drilling a 0.5mm hole in a length of tubing which will be the prop hub. The idea is to insert a piece of pin at right angles, to form a rigid framework for the prop blades.

2. The drilled end of the tube is filled with ordinary white glue (which is another thing I like; stick to white glue and water-soluble paints as long as possible).

3. A pin is stuck through the hole with white glue inside, and cut off at suitable lengths. The prop will be built up around these pin ends.

4. Prop stiffeners and base mounted. The prop governing mechanism is replicated by a rolled strip of 45g sketching paper ("vellum"). The whole thing is covered with white glue for stiffening. (Note actual parts sheet in the background, where the prop covers, front and back, still remain to be cut out.)

5. The whole thing is painted with grey watercolour pencil (and yes, it sticks also to the plastic part; at least well enough for the moment). Actually you only need to paint the centre part around the hub.

[Continued in the next post]
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Prop-1_drilling-T2.jpg
  • Prop-2_filling-T2.jpg
  • Prop-3_inserting-T2.jpg
  • Prop-4_frame-T2.jpg
  • Prop-5_greypaint-T2.jpg
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Thursday, February 15th 2007, 10:40am

Rotating props in small scales, part II

[Continued from last post]

Outer skins of prop (front and back) are now added, and the plastic tubing cut off at suitable length to form the finished prop. Some kind of rounded front is created, for example by repeated blobs of white glue. I used a cut-off pinhead as a base, which isn't perfect, and I won't do it again.

The whole prop is varnished with gouache varnish matt, which is spirit-soluble, and the one exception from the water-soluble principle I allow myself. It is excellent for varnishing parts sheet before cutting out parts, since it doesn't wrinkle the paper, and equally excellent for varnishing finished sections and the whole model.

6. Here are the finished parts of the prop assembly, ready to be glued together. The axis is a cut-off pin, and the casing to be glued into the model is another piece of 2mm plastic tubing. The prop will rotate glued to the axis within this casing, which is to be glued into model.

Note that the pinhead is smaller than the 2mm plastic tube casing, which will allow inserting into a hole in model without problems. Note also that the construction sketch of the model in the background is to the same 1:87 scale as the prop.

The outer casing is a piece of RC control rod outer tubing. It is very much optional, and I don't think I will use it. If you go for it, you can glue it into the model from the start, and the prop assembly is then glued into that casing instead of into the card parts of the model.

7. The finished assembly is tested according to the familiar hair-dryer principle. It works just fine, and there is no wobbling (which can be seen from this long exposure; the prop shaft would be blurry if there were any wobbling).

Evaluation: I will use this method, but I won't make such a complicated prop hub. A rolled paper part is just as good, and can easily be stuck, and glued, to the prop shaft. In any case, the drilled plastic prop hub can only be used for two-bladed props, not three- or four-bladed ones.

But it was fun to make, just this once.
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Prop-6_finishedparts-T2.jpg
  • Prop-7_testing-T2.jpg
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Wednesday, February 21st 2007, 10:00pm

"Flight of the Phoenix" in 1:87 (parts)

Kindled by the renewed interest in the freeware download model of the "Flight of the Phoenix" aircraft (see this posting here at Kartonbau.de), I looked up the source for the model, downloaded it and rescaled it to 1:87.

Since it is a freeware model, and readily available, I feel free to offer this version as well. Copyright belongs to the original author, Ed Bertchy. The source for his 1:48 original model is this thread at Cardmodels.net. [And since this was first written, the original model has also been added to the Kartonbau.de archive - great news, see the announcement by René Blank.]

As you can read in the introduction to the original model, the aicraft was built in 1965 for the movie Flight of the Phoenix. The aircraft was partially scratch built, but also used other aircraft parts. The wings are the wing panels from a Beechcraft T-11. The wheels and engine are from a T-6. The fuselage, boom and empennage were scratch built made of plywood over a wood frame. The wing and tail wiring was actually clothesline, intentionally used to look flimsly.

The well-known pilot Paul Mantz died in this aircraft at the end of filming when it broke in two during a low pass in Buttercup Valley on July 8, 1965.

The span of the original aircraft was 42 feet, and the length 45 feet. It was powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-1340, 650 hp nine-cylinder radial engine.

The author recommends printing the first four pages on "heavy stock", and page 5 on "plain paper". Page 5 has some duplicate parts that will be easier to assemble if done on thin paper, such as wheel axles and a duplicate engine.

In my version, I have indicated that you should print the first four pages on both 160g and 100g paper. Page 5 should be printed on 100g paper. This way you get an awful lot of duplicate parts, but then again, you might need them...

Sheet size is my - nowadays - standard card size for 1:87 models, fitting both A6 and 4"x6" (10x15 cm) cards. I recommend cutting a small supply of these cards (easily done; four from an A4). They save ink, paper, and space - you can store your model in an ordinary small envelope.

This time downloads are in jpg-format, at 300 dpi resolution. This means that the full size images are very large, but not to worry - just bring them up on the screen, and "save image as...". When you open them in your graphic program, be sure to check that the resolution is 300 dpi (if not, change it to this value for proper 1:87 scale!). The size of your download should be 14 x 9.5 cm.

Some of the sheets are very slightly compressed to adhere to the 500 KB limit. If you want the model for any other purpose than building in 1:87 scale, download the original in 1:48 scale!

Here are the downloads for the five parts sheets. (Instructions, intro, and cover in the next posting.)
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Parts-1.jpg
  • Parts-2.jpg
  • Parts-3.jpg
  • Parts-4.jpg
  • Parts-5.jpg
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Wednesday, February 21st 2007, 10:03pm

"Flight of the Phoenix" in 1:87 (instructions)

Here are the downloads for the instructions and a small introductory sheet with source and credits. Most of the text from the introductory original sheet has been quoted in the previous posting as well.

And while you're at it, don't forget to print the "Cover" page on the envelope for the model as well!

Now all that's missing are a number of small paper figures to recline on the wings, holding on for their lives, and a pilot of course...

By the way, how many people rode the "Phoenix" in the film - five, seven?

And a last P.S. - judging from the instructions sheet, I think the method of making propellers outlined in two postings above would be an improvement and suit the "Phoenix" eminently well!
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Instr-1.jpg
  • Instr-2.jpg
  • Instr-3.jpg
  • Intro.jpg
  • Cover.jpg
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Saturday, February 24th 2007, 3:30pm

Porsche 935 in 1/87

Hello Leif,
I want you, and the people who read this thread, to know that I started building the Porsche I downscaled here:
Porsche 935 in 1zu87

Greetings Holger

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Sunday, February 25th 2007, 10:44pm

Nine-cylinder radial engine for 1:87

Here's my solution to the problem of making complicated nine-cylinder radial engines, such as Pratt & Whitney Wasp or Wright Cyclone, for small scale models.

Just make a multilayered profile, of a 3-D enhanced image of the original engine. Then stick the prop-unit described above through a 2-mm hole in the centre.

The last improvement for the engine as shown here actually was taken from the "Phoenix" model above. Ed Bertchy had made such a good version of the ignition wiring harness, that I felt pressed to include something similar (the yellow spiderweb).

But it all started with an old drawing for a plywood version of the Cyclone engine, published in the April 1936 issue of "Flying Aces".

Says the source: "Engine modeling was quite popular at that time, if the number of construction articles mean anything. Of course, these articles were critical to those solid modelers who ventured into building an exposed radial powered bipe" (without proper level of engine detailing).

It is quite fascinating how a more than 70-year old drawing of a model engine in plywood can be really useful for cardmodelling today!

The drawing has only one detailed cylinder, but it was an easy job with modern software to make a full nine-cylinder front view. This was 3-D enhanced in Photoshop, and then split up into several layers to simulate depth, and the frontal dome-shaped part.

Fuel pump and ignition wires were added and 3-D enhanced as well. Cam pushrods can be simulated by thin, straight pieces of wire.

Copy any or all parts in the download below into the 1:87 project of your choice. Adapt the cowling base and fuselage former to your needs.

The download for the 1:87 parts is an uncompressed jpg image at 300 dpi resolution. Save the full-size version of the image below (some four times larger than real size at screen resolution), and check that the size of the downloaded image is 6 x 4,5 cm, 300dpi.

I would suggest printing on 270g and doubling with 160g, if you want to get proper 1:87 "XX"-thickness (simulating 1mm in 1:33).

Sources for the Cyclone and Wasp engine illustrations are the French Nostavia site for the Cyclone, and Griff Wasons 3-D illustrations for the Wasp. For more of Griff Wasons wonderful 3-D imagery, go here. You'll find many more engines, a Fokker DrI, and much more.

If you have an interest in modeling history you can also download the original 1935 vintage drawing of the Cyclone model engine. What you get is a pdf-file with a transcript of the original article, some original photos, plus the drawing reproduced below (at no particular scale).
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Nine-cylinder_radial-187.jpg
  • PW-Cyclone-orig.jpg
  • cyclone-scale-model.jpg
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Sunday, February 25th 2007, 10:48pm

... and here's what it looks like

Here's what the first version looks like in a test-build. The download version above contains one more layer at the front, to make the crankcase dome-shaped part a bit thicker.

(1) A sharpened instrument screw driver comes in really handy when cutting out those small areas between the cylinders. It works like a very fine chisel, and you can have several widths handy. Press down about 250 times on an old cutting mat (this work injures cutting mats!) for three layers of engine cylinder parts, and you're all done.

(2) Adding the pushrods of 0.3 mm straightened wire was almost beyond me. Each pushrod is 4 mm long. I know this is large in the eyes of some experts on the site, but there are 18 of them and my hands tend to shake enough to make this work distinctly uncomfortable.

Incidentally, I took what I had in the shape of wires that seemed about right, but 0.3 mm should be close enough to true scale at 1:87 - it translates to about 25 mm (1 inch) in full scale.

(3) Finished test-build, with the prop unit manufactured earlier inserted (just for testing).

The fomers have been sanded for equal roundness & size in the dremel. The 2 mm hole for the prop unit enables you to use a 2 mm bolt & nuts to keep the parts together. Insert the bolt in the dremel after clamping the two parts together between extra protective pieces of cards on both sides.

(4) And a final close-up. Being able to identify my fingerprint ought to be close enough, right?
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Chiseling.jpg
  • Pushrods.jpg
  • Finished.jpg
  • Final_closeup.jpg
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Monday, February 26th 2007, 12:23am

Good Technique for :87

Hi Leif,

Good work! This is a great technique for 1:87. The paper thickness tends toward the actual depth of the radial engine. Addding the pushrod relief is a great piece of trompe d'oeil...,

-Gil
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Monday, February 26th 2007, 3:41am

RE: Good Technique for :87

Hoi Leif,

Thank you very much for this great thread, it is the same to me as a good book: once read, I will read it again and again!

met vriendelijke groeten,
Gert
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Wednesday, February 28th 2007, 4:42pm

Poorman's magnifying lamp

For the work above I seriously needed to use a magnifying lens. What I had was a plastic lens, originally bought for embroidering. It was a bit awkward, since the lens attaches by a thread around the neck and rests against your chest. You had to adjust the length of the thread irritatingly often, and on top of that it tended to slip away from your chest right in the middle of some sensitive work.

So now I have been looking with envy & greed on advertisments for magnifying lamps for a while, and also noticed that several of you have been able to invest in such a great tool. At 60-100 euros, however, it is simply beyond me.

After having struck out at e-bay and similar sites, I just happened (while desperately googling) to come across a thread from a roleplaying site, where some young people suggested attaching a magnifying lens to an ordinary lamp to use when painting small figures.

That was exactly the kind of bright idea I needed! Attaching my simple plastic lens to the lamp worked out beautifully, as you can see from the photo below. The handle is transparent plastic as well, so it doesn't even hog any light.

I just used a thick elastic band, and made a small embellishment in the form of a distance piece of wood to get the angle right. The little distance piece is glued to the lens with double-surfaced tape, and it makes the light fall more precisely on the focal point of the lens. Here are some of the advantages:

+ Very simple to adjust the height for working either on the cutting mat, or, for example, when you hold up small pieces with a pair of tweezers when painting.

+ The light automatically falls where you need it.

+ Fully detachable. Just slip off the elastic band, and the lamp is back to normal - or let it stay on permanently; the lens is not in the way for most other work.

+ Cheap. I would imagine a plastic lens like this costs - at most - one tenth of a true magnifying lamp. Try your local embroidery shop (or perhaps a stamp collectors shop!).

Many thanks to the roleplaying people for this great idea!
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following image:
  • Poormans_magnifying_lamp.jpg
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Sunday, March 4th 2007, 7:12pm

Recolouring chart

I was doing a bit of recolouring of a US end-of-WWII aircraft, and thought that I might share the result of the research on colours. You'll find it at the bottom as a download to keep handy for your own recolourings.

These colours are good for USAAF aircraft from 1943-45. The single colour I have found most use for is actually the interior green. In many older Fly models, which are otherwise good, the interior is a sickening, almost fluorescent, green which just cries out for a recolouring.

Similarly, I think the olive drab and neutral grey (for bottom of wings, fuselage, and sundry details) are quite an improvement on at least the older Fly models printing.

The orange yellow is for identification lettering, propeller tips, etc.

The zinc chromate is a anti-corrosive paint for aluminium surfaces. It was used in wheel wells and other interior places which were exposed to the elements (but not for the interior of the cabin). Zinc chromate came in many nuances, this is pretty close to at least one of them. It is a colour often forgotten in most card models.

Insignia blue & white are for national markings of those particular years. Just a few years earlier you would have had a different nuance of blue, plus a red outlining. I have used insignia white also for D-day stripes, which is quite good since it is a slightly warmer nuance than just pure white. I imagine it would be good also for the exterior white of airliners of any era.

The source for these colour samples is the outstanding Chandelle aviation colours chart. I strongly recommend you to bookmark this page - and why not download the whole page; you get the small colour samples as jpg-files automatically!

An illustration of what the chart for Germany looks like follows.

These colour samples are supposed to come as close as possible to the original. However, there is always controversy around colours, and in any case you will have to lighten the real nuances up quite a bit, particularly if your project is in a small scale, if you want the impression to be the same as of a full-size aircraft.

I have done that in the second column of the card below. Use it if you like the result. Or, even better, go to the Chandelle site and copy exactly what you need, and then proceed to lighten up those colours and make your own project-specific colour chart.

It is most useful to have around on the computer when you recolour.

The image marked "Sample" is just for viewing here on the site. Download the pdf file. It is 300 dpi, and the size of the image is 14 x 9,5 cm, good for printing on an A6 or 10x15 cm (4"x6") card - although it is not really for printing but for keeping handy on your computer when recolouring.

At Jan's request (see post immediately below; thanks Jan for teaching me something new again!) I tried a BMP version. This, however, turned out to be of humongous size. Therefore I have added the zipped pdf instead. Hopefully this will carry the colours as well - I haven't found any discrepancies when testing the download.
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Colours-Chandelle.jpg
  • Colours-sample.jpg
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following file:
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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Sunday, March 4th 2007, 7:22pm

Hi Leif,
You should put the images in bmp format as jpeg tends to slightly alter the colours. But anyways this thread still amazes me :]

Cheers
Jan
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Monday, March 5th 2007, 12:57pm

Made a lighter grey

Dear friends,

After having slept on my recolouring efforts I had a closer look at them in broad daylight and found that the neutral grey used for bottom sides of wings and fuselage, plus various details, still was too dark for small models.

So I went back and recoloured the whole thing in a lighter nuance. This is very easy once you have taken care to save selections of "neutral grey". It took me some ten minutes to change the whole model (some ten sheets all in all), which is even quicker than writing this posting.

I have deleted the previous sample & download files above and substituted new versions in that post. I also exchanged the .bmp format recommended by Jan for a zipped pdf of the file. I hope that will keep the colours as well. In any case, it is only 3 percent of the .bmp filesize!

Sorry for causing confusion, but that's the way it goes when you keep learning and experimenting.

Leif
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Monday, March 5th 2007, 10:25pm

Interior green vs. zinc chromate

Here are two photos to enable comparison between interior green, and zinc chromate. Both are from a B-17; one from the radio operator's place, and one from the wheel well. I hope you think the samples above capture the difference.

The two sources, here and here, are great for B-17 and B-24.

(And no, I'm not doing any of them, although I have them both in old Fly versions, and they are very tempting...)
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following image:
  • Colours-comp.jpg
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Friday, March 9th 2007, 8:40pm

Rescaling and recolouring the Fly Model C47

I have had a go at one of the old and larger kits, the Fly Model C-47, which is printed on sheets that are almost A3 in size.

When you reduce these to 38 percent in order to arrive at 1:87 scale it turns out that each sheet fits very well into standard A5. The very good thing abou tit is that there is ample room left to space out the parts from each other.

Already in the original 1:33, parts are crammed together very tight (in order to bring down the number of printed sheets, no doubt). Reduced to 1:87 it is just impossible (at least for me) to contemplate cutting out these parts cleanly.

So the first major job was to do the tedious rearranging of parts for 9 sheets with parts, plus three sheets with instructions. Took me the best part of a week, but now that it's done I think it was well worth it, and I can thoroughly recommend the practice. While you're tinkering with each part on the computer you really get to learn the model very well.

The next thing to do was recolouring the whole kit. I used the colour chart posted above, and used the magic wand tool throughout (which is the "quick-and-dirty" method).

One learning experience is that it is better to go through a whole sheet with the magic wand tool set to NOT picking up every selected colour pixel in the sheet, but just a single non-interrupted coloured area (typically one panel on the fin or fuselage, outlined by darker panel lines). This way you'll reduce the number of panel lines picked up by mistake (and thereby hidden by your new coloured layer).

Even if you choose this more tedious way, recolouring is much quicker than rearranging parts. And experimenting with different shades of colour is GREATLY enhanced if you learn how to save the selections you make for each sheet. Then you can just bring up, for example, "olive drab" or "neutral grey" and recolour everything on the sheet with your new preferred shade in an instant.

Below you will find illustrations comparing two of the sheets in the kit, one with interior parts and one with exterior. Notice how much better the interior looks in the new shade of green. Notice also how cramped the original sheets in the left column are compared to the rearranged & recoloured ones in the right column.

The single picture at the end is an illustration of how "quick and dirty" this method of recolouring really is. It shows the recoloured layer of one of the sheets. In all the white areas between coloured fields either panel lines or fragments of original colour will come out from the original layer preserved intact below.

Since your are working with roughly the same colours as the original this is hardly noticeable. It would be a different matter if you were going to replace the original colours with a totally different colour scheme.

I am sorry that for copyright reasons I can't share these reworked and rescaled sheets. I still hope that the exercise might serve as an inspiration for similar experiments with your own favourite model. It is well worth the effort with these older models, whether you rescale or not.
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Sheet-1_original.jpg
  • Sheet-1_recoloured.jpg
  • Sheet-5_original.jpg
  • Sheet-5_recoloured.jpg
  • Sheet-5_recolouringonly.jpg
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Friday, March 9th 2007, 8:55pm

Kartonbau.de grew so much in the last year or two that some things might be forgotten. At this point I just wanted to remind you all of berndio's magnificent Dakota:
[Fertig] Fly Model, Nr. 101, Douglas C-47A "Skytrain", 1:33

Cheers
Jan
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Saturday, March 10th 2007, 12:56am

Experimenting with a DC3 alu finish

Jan, I agree; Berndio's photo story of building the C47 is not only a pleasure to view in itself; it should be obligatory reading for anybody attempting a build of the Fly Model C-47. Thank you for inserting it.

At present I am using the rescaled model for an attempt to come to grips with the problem of alu (bare metal) finishes on aircraft, such as the civilian DC3. The pictures below show where I am now - just making a few preliminary sketches. In order:

(1) Starting with the sideview of the C47 in the instructions...

(2) Under that, I placed a coloured image (by "nag") of the Swedish flying veteran DC3, fondly known as "Daisy", but properly named SE-CFP "Fridtjof Viking".

The painting was only used for correct positioning of the logo, etc. It was then turned off.

(3) The SAS logo and other markings were relatively easy, although I haven't got the proper typeface to recreate the logo as it should be (but then, neither has such a talented artist as "nag", it seems - nor did he manage to get the full name of the SAS quite correct!).

The simple Helvetica bold italic (made even bolder and more italicized in Photoshop) will have to do for now. If anybody has access to the actual full text logo and dragon head in a reasonably high resolution, I would be very grateful.

(4) The alu finish is the difficult part. Here I have experimented with the gradient tool in Photoshop. The different shades (parts of the gradient spectrum) were inspired by a photo of the Daisy on the tarmac at Bromma airport, Stockholm:

(5) Notice in this picture how the shining aluminium surface reflects in turn (from above): the dark underside of clouds plus some sky blue; bright direct sunlight; the forest at the edge of the airfield; and finally the tarmac below.

These are the shades that have to be replicated on an aircraft on the ground. In the picture I have included samples of what I used for the gradient tool. I did some experimenting with the tool, so that the fuselage, fin, wing, and engine nacelle have different proportions of these basic ingredients.

In the air, the effect is quite different as you can see from the other photo - here you only see different shades of blue, either from the sky above or the sea below, plus direct sunlight reflections. (As another example, I would say that "nag", in picture 2, has painted a DC3 flying under cloud cover but with blue sky at the horizon and land underneath.)

Notice in the close-up photo of the "Daisy" how panel & rivet lines are either lighter, or darker, than the panels themselves, depending on what is reflected. This indicates that 50 percent grey or so may be the ideal colour for panel & rivet lines. (I have noticed earlier that a designer like Gabriel Panait used 60 percent in his free download model of the Mig-17; see this thread here at Kartonbau.de on recolouring. The way to go would probably be to copy or redraw in black all panel & rivet lines in a separate layer, and then adjust the fill level for best overall effect.)

In this initial attempt (the fourth picture) - which is just a sort of preliminary map for recolouring individual parts - I have lightened up a few random individual panels. This is a feature often apparent in photos of bare metal aircraft. It could be used to advantage on panels crossing joint lines, in an effort to conceal these. Also, notice how "nag" has used it quite extensively in his painting.

I have only just begun to learn to use the gradient tool. Recolouring all the parts in the whole kit this way will take a lot of work which I don't know if I am up to. For starters, it would mean cleaning up the original scan from all remnants of other colours, and possibly even redrawing panel lines, and outlines. Then a proper map of how to apply the gradients would have to be made on a three-view of the aircraft. Only then, the recolouring with the gradient tool of individual parts could begin. This may all be a bit too much for me.

I think I will have to leave it here, at least for a while.

Sources: For the beautiful original "nag" painting - and others by this artist - see "nag's gallery"; and for the "Daisy", see the webpage of "Flygande veteraner" (flying veterans) and particularly their photo gallery. National emblems and proper colour shades for the SAS logo were picked from the logos in the last picture below, found after an "SAS logo" search on the net.
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Alu-1-sideview.jpg
  • Alu-2-NAG.jpg
  • Alu-3-SAS-scheme.jpg
  • Alu-4-gradients.jpg
  • Daisy-photos.jpg
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

Gil Russell

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194

Saturday, March 10th 2007, 10:26am

Horizon Line

Hi Leif,

I find it great that you're forging ahead with the aluminum question. I guess you've been looking at the P-47 on cardmodel.net being done by John Griffin.

http://www.cardmodels.net/forum/showthread.php?t=6940

One thing that I've found when applying the "finish" is to have a firm idea of what's being reflected by the aluminum panels from the surround. You've done a great job so far. The unrolled panels can be colored by sampling the associated area in the side view artwork and applying those values to the diamonds in the gradient editor. A couple of hints would be; try using a very faint layer of clouds under the render to vary the reflectance of individual panels; remember to apply a layer of gausian noise and then move it with motion blur; smudges need to be added around access panels as well as chipped paint if applicable; add a layer for rivet and panel line drop shadows. That's about all I can remember at this point. One other point though, keep at it. In a manner of a few days your confidence level will undergo a dramatic change as these few items rapidly progress the realism of the artistic render....,


Best regards,

-Gil Russell
I got carded!

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "Gil Russell" (Mar 10th 2007, 10:32am)


Leif Ohlsson

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195

Tuesday, March 20th 2007, 4:01pm

Extracting a pager motor from a phone

My old mobile phone gave up all signs of life yesterday. Having gotten a new one today, I immediately started to dig into the old one to see if I could extract the pager motor (as Jan and others had recommended).

The pictures will speak for themselves. The one part I am a bit uncertain about is the correct procedure for extracting the counterweight. I put the weight very rigidly in a vice (the pager motor itself hanging free). The axis was then tapped a coupe of times with a needle, and the motor fell down to the floor after a few careful taps.

Now this may have hurt the litte beggar too much, or else the 3.6V battery in the phone is too high a voltage. I simply can't get it to run. But then, I can't get my purchased Namiki pager motor to run on that battery either, so perhaps I have managed to destroy two very nice little pager motors just being impatient.

In any case, now you know where to find a pager motor, if you are so inclined. A better solution still is to contact Pager motors who have very reasonable prices.

This is kind of a disappointing report, but that's what I have at the moment.

In the last picture you will notice that the pager motor extracted from my old Nokia phone is even smaller than the purchased Namiki motors (although not so much that it is of any importance - 4 x 15 mm or thereabouts is small enough for all I can think of!)
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • Position.jpg
  • Extracted.jpg
  • Tapping.jpg
  • Separated.jpg
  • Comparison.jpg
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

Leif Ohlsson

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196

Thursday, May 31st 2007, 3:44pm

Flying paper model powered by capacitor and pager motor - free download

Just a note to report that Popular Science has realized the idea ventured in this thread to use capacitors and a pager motor to power a scale paper model aircraft. The model and instructions can be downloaded - free! - from this link.

The setup recommended is built upon a pager motor, plus a special capacitor (Panasonic "Gold cap", 2.5V, 3.3F). The capacity is thus some five times greater than the one I suggested earlier in this thread. Running time is specified as 10 seconds with this capacitor, which means I was overly optimistic in my calculations (but still within ball park range).

Have a look at the photos. The idea is to charge the capacitor from a battery pack until the propeller spins as fast as it will go, then release the contacts and let the little plane fly. Note that they have picked up on the idea (and improved on it) with pins as contacts.

Pictured below (photo: Popular Science) is a Zero, but the downloadable model is a Texan, which can be painted also as a Zero. The canopy is purchased. All information at the original link.

I can only say that I never envisaged that a pager motor could power a flying paper model - my idea was only for show - but here, apparently, is evidence to the contrary.
Leif Ohlsson has attached the following images:
  • plane_1.jpg
  • plane_4.jpg
  • plane_3.jpg
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

This post has been edited 4 times, last edit by "Leif Ohlsson" (May 31st 2007, 3:51pm)


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