Posts by Gil Russell

    Hi Leif,


    I find it great that you're forging ahead with the aluminum question. I guess you've been looking at the P-47 on cardmodel.net being done by John Griffin.


    http://www.cardmodels.net/forum/showthread.php?t=6940


    One thing that I've found when applying the "finish" is to have a firm idea of what's being reflected by the aluminum panels from the surround. You've done a great job so far. The unrolled panels can be colored by sampling the associated area in the side view artwork and applying those values to the diamonds in the gradient editor. A couple of hints would be; try using a very faint layer of clouds under the render to vary the reflectance of individual panels; remember to apply a layer of gausian noise and then move it with motion blur; smudges need to be added around access panels as well as chipped paint if applicable; add a layer for rivet and panel line drop shadows. That's about all I can remember at this point. One other point though, keep at it. In a manner of a few days your confidence level will undergo a dramatic change as these few items rapidly progress the realism of the artistic render....,



    Best regards,


    -Gil Russell

    Hi Leif,


    No effort for the same effect is one my mottos..., Instead of cutting the notch why not just clamp the two halves together and enlarge the whole with a larger drill size? Do about two or three dozen in one sitting for a lifetime of mini flat clamps. I call the others mini pinch clamps. Michael Urban mentioned that the tips could be sanded for special clamping operations which I've done in the past on the full size versions.


    -Gil

    Hello All,


    It looks like a lot of tools but many of them were discarded during the development in favor of simpler more available material methods. The ability to make them at this scale can now be easily achieved by most card modelers. I am currently doing one last iteration before the tutorial build (PDF format). It should result in the wheel being even easier to build. I think you'll see that it's worth it.


    Motorcycles and bicycles are now at our beckon call with this method as are spoked wheels for automobiles. It is hard for me to express the joy one has when using the lacing fixture to make the spokes. It's better than being a kid in a candy shop believe me!


    Best Regards, -Gil

    Leif,


    Truth is that I've made them that way also and had them twist apart in my finger tips due to the lack of a slot on that side. Amazingly enough your discovery is a most welcome addition to the stable of clamping devices. Thanks!


    Best Regards, Gil Russell

    Hi Leif,


    Wow it's really interesting how fast things travel these days! The clothespin idea is an old stick and tissue modelers trick that I picked up somewhere long ago, just applied it to the miniature clothespins and voila! a cheap and available cardmodeling clamp. I noticed that you cut a notch in the wood to help keep the spring clip aligned. If you look closely at the way the the wood parts are oriented in your photo you'll see that you need to rotate each 180 degrees to equal how they are arranged in my setup. The notch is already there on the wood shank!


    Best regards, Gil Russell

    Zec,


    Hardening the backside of the paper with PVA (white glue) and then sanding the edges (at an angle to reduce the paper thickness) before glueing them together will reduce the edge effect. Also removing the black line and coloring the edge before laminating them together will also help.


    Best regards,


    -Gil Russell

    Leif,


    Nice source validation. The amount of material on the internet is great. Only problem is that most of the drawings are junk and require more time to fix than they're worth. Derek Buckmaster's drawings are accurate from prior experiences I've had with the material (I have further detailed material on the CA-15 ordered). Some of the stick & tissue models can be easily converted to cardmodels. Just think what a conversation piece a cardmodel of the following aircraft would be:


    Transavia PL-12 Airtruk
    [Blocked Image: http://www.aamb.com.au/images/airtrukfly.jpg]


    -Gil Russell

    Leif,


    Earlier on you posted 1:87 scale figures and wondered whether facial features would be appropriate. I have a project which needs such a figure and the results of experimenting is shown below. The original photograph of the head was filtered with the poster effects filter in Photoshop before being overlayed on the figure. It allows the features to remain after scaling down to the level of 1:87.


    -Gil Russell


    [Blocked Image: http://img81.imageshack.us/img81/146/jph187r2mj1.jpg]

    Leif, Jan,


    Google micro pager motors. One site is:


    http://www.goldmine-elec-produ…rodinfo.asp?number=G12809


    These motors are the same types that are used by the Micro RC indoor airplane people to power their peanut scale creations. One of the Radio Shack Zip-Zap motors that I have claims something like 23,000 rpm! The next step is to obtain low cost gear trains compatible with these small sized motors. They're small enough that tweezers are recommended to handle them. I've been wondering why some of the armour gurus haven't warmed up to powering a 1:72 or 1:70 scale tank model with a ripped set of controls from one of the micro RC cars. It would really be quite amazing to practice tank warfare on your desk! In any event they're the perfect size to direct drive props in 1:87 scale aircraft. Beginning to wonder whether a 1:87 could be built light enough out of paper to fly. I've seen a slightly smaller RC model that actually flies quite well but is a little hard to see at any distance due to its dimunitive size..., just wondering...,


    -Gil Russell

    Hi Leif,


    The original pictures were lost with one of the recurring wipeouts of the cardmodel.net site and for some reason I didn't save the files (or did and just can't find it). The following should satisfy the measurements. I think the voltage is around 3 Volts but will have to be verified.


    -Gil Russell


    P.S. Oliver, it was late, I was tired, I was hungry..., but sushi is not a paint, at least not yet...,


    [Blocked Image: http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/3489/zipzapmeastx9.jpg]

    Hi Leif,


    I posted a note regarding these motors on cardmodels.net some time ago. Radio Shack sells a micro RC brand of subminiature cars under the name "Zip-Zaps". The page for the motors is here:


    http://www.radioshack.com/prod…413&parentPage=family


    They're for sale in store only so I'm not sure about their availability in the EU. The motors are from pagers and can be found from other sources of micro RC gear online.


    Best regards, -Gil Russell

    Hello All,


    It's been a while since the last post on the DH2 build. In the meantime I've been thinking about a way to eliminate the foam wing insert so that the model is closer to 100% paper. The closeup photo below shows a tentative result of the process which needs a little further "tweaking" before a formal debut but is showing all the signs of success. I'm beginning to realize that this technique could have expanded implications in cardmodeling but will hold back on those ideas for the time being and focus on the finishing the build.


    -Gil Russell


    [Blocked Image: http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/6102/wingtech14cc8.jpg]

    The following message was passed by Rick on Google Papermodels:



    Hi all,


    Cardmodels.net is temporarily down due to a change to new servers and
    potentially a new Board OS.


    I will try to keep all of those who are interested informed, of the status
    of the site.


    Rick


    The change over can last up to three days. Hopefully it will be back tomorrow so just be patient. The site was becoming slightly unstable over the last several weeks. Hopefully the new server will be more stable...,


    -Gil Russell

    Good Morning Leif,


    Glad to contribute to the effort..., besides it's fun while at the same time challenging.


    I've found that tempera paint can be used to build up a wire mandrel by using a technique not unlike that used to make candles. It takes a little time for the layers of tempura to set but produces results that would be difficult to obtain using other methods. The tailwheel was simply a couple of paper punch disks which were glued together to acieve the approximate thickness of the tailwheel. A hole was "pinned" in the center of the wheel and the "L" formed wire was inserted into it and cemented in place with CA. The wire was then dipped into the white tempura paint and let dry in between layers to build up the tapered shaft which neatly matches the original. The picture will help clarify this procedure. Once you try this method you'll find all sorts of instances where it will do the trick nicely.


    -Gil Russell


    [Blocked Image: http://img224.imageshack.us/img224/1278/c140tailwheelqy8.jpg]

    Hello All,


    The Cessna 140 is finished. The landing gear struts are per the design but the tires were assembled from two layers of cardboard. After punching and gluing two layers together a pin was used to punch a center hole and the two pieces were drilled with a small diameter printed circuit board drill. The wheel was then mounted on a mandrel and sanded to the shape of a tire followed by black tempura paint. The outside pieces were punched out from Eric's design and glued to either side of the tire. Any white area on the outside of the "hubcaps" was touched up with black paint. The wheels were then glued to the landing gear struts.


    The tailwheel as designed is not strong enough to last any time at all without wire reinforcement. I decided to use a piece of wire and a cardboard punch disc instead. The wire was glued to the disc with CA. The wire section was then repeatedly dipped into white tempura paint to form the tapered tailwheel swing arm. The tire was painted with black tempura. Small discs were cut out of white paper and applied on both sides of the tailwheel to give the appearence of a wheel hub.


    The prop spinner was formed from a stack of cardboard punchouts. The stack was sanded to shape and white tempura paint applied. The spinner was drilled to accept a paper shaft and the two were then glued together. The prop was also drilled to the accept the paper shaft and was then glued to the hub/shaft assembly. This was then simply inserted into a hole in the nose to accept the shaft. It was not glued to avoid damage from the occasional "prop spinner" type.


    In summary the design form and fit was excellent. The wing, elevator and rudder sheet orientation need to be changed in order to align them with paper grain. Some of the items had to be changed to account for the smaller scale and also for reasons of strength and endurance. Also the nose piece can be formed by just embossing it into a round clamshell shape and fitting it to the nose section. One other item that Eric might think about changing is the addition of a former that inserts into the nose piece so that it holds the cross section. This would make mounting the formed nose piece much easier. Building in 1:87 scale is not for those in a hurry. It takes time and will also require some parts to be made more than once but the results are well worth the challenge.


    best regards, Gil Russell
    [Blocked Image: http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/7521/c140completeul6.jpg]

    Hello Lief,


    Answering your questions:


    Q) Is the museum wax and plastic wrap bit necessary? Any other way to do this than using epoxy (which I hate)?


    A) As it works out the museum wax isn't required. The plastic wrap is used as a release agent to keep the glue from sticking to the form. The epoxy I am using is like a log which you slice off a piece and knead (like in dough) it together until well mixed. It gives off a small amount of amine fumes but is not really that annoying. I've found that it can be found at most hardwarre stores and is very useful in making this type of thing. Sculpey might be an alternative that you can try.


    Q) How does the foam rubber bit work?


    A) The paper part is dry formed with the round end of a paint brush or similar tool until it becomes dish shaped. A drop of white glue is spread on the underside of the part and is placed on the form. The whole assembly is then pushed into the foam rubber which exerts a force over the entire surface of the paper such that it conforms closely with the carved form. It is then clamped into place and allowed to sit till the paper-white glue combination drys. It's then partecd from the form and the plastic wrap is pulled off the part. All sorts of small compound curved parts can be constructed this way including cylinder head parts...,


    I think that the Eric's nose design is fairly standard for this style of aircraft but have come to think that a little design change might make forming it a little easier and dates back to the reverse petal design discussion. If I can find enough time I'll reverse engineer a new nose.


    Another small item while I'm thinking of it. I had to cut several sets of the wing struts till I finally executed an acceptable set. The major problem was the paper moving under the straight edge as the last cut was being made. I found that placing the part on a cork pad removed the movement and allowed the cut to be made without the part moving around.


    The windshield , wing panel and wing struts were all joined together tonight. It's beginning to look like a Cessna 140. The fit of these items was dead on. Nice job Eric and thanks.


    Best regards, Gil



    [Blocked Image: http://img160.imageshack.us/img160/5866/c140wingfusevw1.jpg]

    Hello All,


    Decided to make a form to aid in the making of the nose piece. A couple of discs were cut from thin corrugatged cardboard, glued, stacked and drilled to allow a bamboo skewer to be inserted for handling. Epoxy putty was then formed around the discs and shaped like the Cessna's nose. After the epoxy set the plug was carved and test fit to the fuselage opening. A layer of museum wax was applied and melted into the surface of the plug to adhere plastic wrap to the plugs surface. I took Eric's nose piece and enlarged it some using Photoshop and printed out a sheet with a few dozen just in case. The new nose pieces were then coated with sealer. A nose piece was then cut out and dry formed on a sheet of cork. A drop of white glue was then added to the back of the piece and it was then placed on the forming plug. The plug was then pressed into a 10 mm thick piece of foam rubber. The foam rubber exerts a force over the entire surface of the piece making it conform to the plug. The piece was removed from the plug when dry. The back edge was then sanded flat on fine sandpaper and the edge colored. The piece was then glued in place and the edges burnished into those of the fuselage. Notice the residual small edge wrinkles from the forming process proving that it's still made of paper. In retrospect the piece that it attaches too should have been left unglued (per Eric's instructions) to the fuselage. It would have made assembling the nose piece a much easier process..., till next...,


    -Gil Russell


    [Blocked Image: http://img129.imageshack.us/img129/6870/c140noseformxd9.jpg]
    [Blocked Image: http://img123.imageshack.us/img123/2750/c140fusenosekd5.jpg]

    Hi Leif,


    I was able to finish the back half of the fuslage tonight. A couple of things I would have done different first. I used 110 lb. paper for the build. It should have been closer to 67 lb. The rudder and elevators should be on even lighter paper (24-32 lb.). The wing should be aligned vertically to the long axis of the paper. It was difficult to roll due to its "against the grain" orientation on the layout sheet (rudder and elevators should be oriented in this respect also).


    The fuselage join tab was cut off and plain butt joints were used instead. The fit of the design is great allowing butt joints to be used. I use masking tape cut into 2 mm wide strips from de-sticked tape to clamp the fuselage halves together. De-sticking the tape means applying it to a surface and removing several times to reduce the tack of the tape. It's also a good idea to seal the paper surface before beginning with a sealer coat so glue goofs and edge paint can be easily cleaned off. It has the added effect of preventing the masking tape strips from tearing the surface of the paper when removed. The masking tape strips are used to close the glued joints of the fuselage a section at a time. Once the the seams were all taped a layer of white glue was painted on all interior joints to strenghten them. The fuselage, once dry, was worked with a small "spoon" shaped tool against a glass plate backing. A shaped cross piece was added under the engine decking to flatten it. Notice that one of the elevators is crooked in the photo, I really didn't notice the misalignment till I looked at the photo (it's been fixed). Aligning the tail elements is a bit "twiddly". I was thinking of building a jig to stabilize it but decided to to do the "fiddly-twiddly" once again.


    One other interesting point is I am finding it difficult to photograph at this scale as the depth of field is very small.


    -Gil Russell


    [Blocked Image: http://img133.imageshack.us/img133/271/c140fuse1mz2.jpg]

    Quote

    Originally posted by Leif Ohlsson
    Those are beautiful wings, Gil! Could you explain in a few words just what you mean by "the pleat in the upper surface wing bow is left uncut" - that is the suggested cutout in the wing-tip upper surface, right? The technique to avoid those cutouts (which tend to spoil a model) would really merit some further description!
    ...,
    RGB 30-0-10, and RGB 95-95-80 might be about right for wine-red and cream, or what do you all say? Grateful for suggestions for improvements here.


    Hi Lief,


    The more correct sewing term is "dart" and yes, your description of it accurate, "that is the suggested cutout in the wing-tip upper surface"..., I learned this technique from "Swinger" of Poland who to my knowlege was the first to post the method. Luckily that thread is still in existence on Cardmodels.net and can be found here:


    http://www.cardmodels.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1667&highlight=Swinger


    The colors swatches are very near to the photograph but as you realize everyones system and printer will yield their own interpretation. I've actually come up with an idea that might solve this problem using Photoshop and uses just Photoshop, screen, target paper and your printer. Open the photograph in PS. Use the eyedropper tool to sample several shades of the intended color or colors and write these values down. Print out enlarged sections of the color areas for comparison swatches. Open a new document of say around 30 mm by 240 mm. Do some avergaing math on earlier recorded values to obtain an average for the midpoint value for each RGB component and note the highest and lowest value of your target colors. Open up the gradient tool. Set the endpoints to the high and low values respectivley and set the midpoint values to your computed averages (make sure to save the gradient). Apply this to the 30 x 240 mm "color swatch" and divide it into say 8 squares. Print one of these for each target color. Now compare the swatch color to your enlarged color sections for a color match. Note which of the 8 squares it is. Go back to PS and sample the square on the swatch. You now have a color match that will print as near to the orginal as is possible. Note that some colors will be outside the color gamut and will not work with this method.


    Best regards, Gil Russell


    P.S. Note that the second color match doesn't have to be a photograph to perform the color match. It can be the actual object itself. The photograph is just a mechanism to transfer the initial color information into PS in order to generate the color swatch comparison bar...,

    Hi All,


    Lief, I was able to take another try at the Cessna wing this afternoon. Unfortunately the photos of the early stages of the build were lost due to unknown but not recurring computer interface problems. The cut out spar was used and works as advertised. I am rather pleased with the results of the wing tips which took repeated applications of white glue and burnishing to achieve the smooth closure. The paper needs to be sealed for this process to work otherwise the paper turns to mush. Note that the pleat in the upper surface wing bow is left uncut. Till next...,


    -Gil Russell


    [Blocked Image: http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/3047/c140wing1gg6.jpg] [Blocked Image: http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/4258/c140wig2cs6.jpg]

    Hi Leif,


    Eric's model seems to be very nicely done. It would look great in an HO layout. Shrunk by 82.76% I had a go at the wing. It came out ok but will need to be redone (did an experiment to form rounded wingtips which worked). The spar was changed from "built up" to a 1 mm "cutout". Much easier this way. Hopefully I'll get a chance tonight to do another.


    -Gil Russell

    Hey Squinty! Somebody stapled your engine!


    I think you're on a campaign to get an HO train set this coming Christmas. Cunning! Very cunning way to slide into it..., If you want to be permanently blind why not try N scale? 1:152 (2 mm to the foot, go figure). Near enough to 1:144 no one would really ever notice. Maybe Texman is a closet N scaler..., More to this story than meets the eye...., Having a good time following this thread! Keep it going!


    -Gil Russell

    Hello Leif,


    Great subject! If I remember correctly the Tokyo Maritime Museum is within walking distance of the Yokohoma Grand Hotel where I've stayed many times. I remember the Emily there and am somewhat suprised that it was moved but on second thought if it's on display "inside" that is good. The Tokyo summer sun can really takes its toll on artifacts. This would make a great subject for 1:72 or even 1:48. I think Hasegawa did a model on it some time back but for some reason got the wing turrets wrong and the kit was panned by most plastic modelers. -Gil Russell

    Hi Leif,


    Very impressive! They're much better than billboard characters, in fact they're better than the molded plastic HO scale characters. Need to put a bullhorn in the hand of the first mate and a coil of rope for the deck hands, a pair of field glasses in the captains hands...,


    -Gil Russell

    Leif,


    The picture in you last post gave me an idea. Make an assortment of 1:87 aircraft models. To show them arrange them on glass beaded pins like a dragon fly (libelle) collection. This would cause a double take when suitably mounted on the wall...,


    -Gil Russell