Posts by jimkrauzlis

    :usenglish:
    Hello, Piet!
    Please include me in your growing list of customers for this beautiful containership. I have been waiting for a nice model of a real containership for quite some time, and this one looks to be a perfect example.
    I do look forward to hearing of your progress on this project.
    With warmest regards,
    Jim


    Hallo, Piet!
    Schließen Sie mich bitte in Ihre wachsende Kundenliste für dieses schöne Containerschiff mit ein. Ich warte seit einiger Zeit auf ein nettes Modell eines vorbildgetreuen Containerschiffs und dieses sieht nach einem vollkommenen Exemplar aus.


    Ich freue mich, von Ihrem Fortschritt bei diesem Projekt zu hören.
    Mit wärmstem Respekt
    Jim


    (Could someone check and make sure the Altavista translation correctly conveys my message? Many thanks!)
    (Done, Jim)

    Thank you, my friends!


    @ Wilfried: Thanks so much for the photographs. I found very few on line, mostly black and white, but the photo of "Remscheid" in color will be valuable! Not sure how much detail I can fit into this little fellow, but I also have the 1:250 Solingen to be built later on so the photo will really help for that one.


    Fitzban: I have to admit it's a problem handling parts at times, but it's also fun...of course without clip-on eyeglass magnifiers to help I couldn't even build at 1:100 scale! ;)


    Cheers!
    Jim

    Another area where the paper thickness factors into the scale is the inside parts of the bulwarks...the original design has the interior bulwark attached to the main deck, and they fold up and glue to the inside of the hull sides. There was a slight fitting problem because of this, and the final bulwark is thicker than it should be. In the next build I would simply remove those interior portions, opting to paint the inside bulwarks instead, and have the deck installed without the interior bulwark tabs.


    Well, just two more views for today...


    [Blocked Image: http://img439.imageshack.us/img439/3797/constructionphotos0484tt.jpg]


    [Blocked Image: http://img439.imageshack.us/img439/566/constructionphotos0529qy.jpg]


    Not sure if I will get a lot of time today to continue, besides I'm still redoing the 36 foot pinnance on my Constitution and I want to get that done too! So many models to work on, but limited time...decisions, decisions! :roll:


    Thanks for stopping by to have a look!


    Happy New Year to one and all!!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Here you can see the start of adding the deck levels to the midship house...again, the decks fit onto the center former using a slot, and I found no problem with the paper thickness in making this joint properly.


    [Blocked Image: http://img439.imageshack.us/img439/183/3addedsomeofthehousedeckingbut.jpg]


    The decks went on fairly quickly, and this is where I am after two days of working on her, in the evening hours:


    [Blocked Image: http://img439.imageshack.us/img439/9461/constructionphotos0395ux.jpg]


    [Blocked Image: http://img439.imageshack.us/img439/491/constructionphotos0414rk.jpg]


    The forward part of the house wraps around the midship house and fit fairly way, although I did notice a slight difference in the way it lined up along the sides because of the paper thickness...I used 65# paper, so it's not really all that thick, but the smaller scale makes it a possible factor in some parts of the construction, like with the forward house wrap around.


    Here's another view:


    [Blocked Image: http://img439.imageshack.us/img439/2411/constructionphotos0456my.jpg]


    (continued)

    Hi, All!:)


    What better way to start off the new year but with a new model? :]


    I figured I would try something new with something new, so I reduced this kit to a Micromodel scale...it is a Wilhelmshaven model from the Lehrmittelinstitut series originally in 1:500 scale (this one of the KREFELD is a motor ship freighter, kit number 502), which I scanned and then printed out at 50% to give me a 1:1000 scale ship model. At this scale, as I am learning, the paper thickness has to be considered as it affects to some degree the way the parts fit together, but more on that later.


    One thing I like about this series, as I'm sure many members here are aware, is the way the formers are made so as to guide the decks into place using slots, and in the larger scale there are slots cut into the deck to help in placement of the bulkheads which have tabs, but I felt it's easier to assemble to remove all tabs, so the slots in the decks were not used in construction...the formers, however, still helped if placing the decks.


    Here's the hull constructed in which you can see the way the formers rise and help in placing the main deck.


    [Blocked Image: http://img439.imageshack.us/img439/7571/1startingoutstillneedssometouc.jpg]


    Here's another view:


    [Blocked Image: http://img439.imageshack.us/img439/4350/2anotherviewstillneedswork9qd.jpg]


    One thing I would do different next time is to detach the hull sides from the base part; as originally designed the sides fold up at the center area, and are glued with tabs at the bow and stern. I felt the paper thickness at this scale imparted a bit of a gap at the fold which I thought, although small, is noticeable and doesn't allow a smooth run of the joint between the sides and base.


    Cheers!
    Jim
    (continued)

    Hallo, Herbert! =)


    Sie ist ein schönes schauendes Schiff! Ich suche immer nach Ihren Pfosten, weil ich weiß, daß ich zu einem großartigen vorbildlichen Schiff behandelt werde, wenn ich.


    Vorwärts schauen zu Ihrem folgenden Bau!


    Haben Sie ein glückliches neues Jahr!!


    Beifall!
    Jim (hoffen Sie, die Übersetzung... jemand gefallen Überprüfung, um sicher zu sein okay ist, daß sie aus O.K., bitte? kam)



    :usenglish:
    Hi, Herbert! =)


    She's a beautiful looking ship! I always look for your posts because I know I will be treated to a superb model ship when I do.


    Looking forward to your next build!


    Have a Happy New Year!!


    Cheers!
    Jim
    (hope the translation is okay...someone please check to be sure it came out okay, please?)

    Wotcher, bazzer! =)


    She looks pretty darn good from where I'm sitting, mate!


    That bow is one of the sharpest I've seen in a while, nicely done, and the run of the hull sides look really good. I don't see any problems that you mention, the houses really look really great and she's a beautiful looking ship! I love the color scheme you are using, it's quite striking from the photos you have posted.


    Keep at it, mate, she's a glorious sight to behold.
    And have a very Happy New Year!!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Hi, Radek! :)


    I'd say your hull planking came out very well indeed!


    From what I recall, the underwater section (the white area) is left a slightly off white to represent a tallow coating ships used before copper was used, such as with HMS Victory. I don't recall the exact time period when coppering was first used, but I think this ship was one of the pre-coppering era ships.


    I have this ship and hope to build it sometime in the near future, so I really appreciate all the tips, expansive descriptions of problems and techniques you are treating us to here...thank you so very much! :]


    Looking forward to more!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Hello, Raimund! :)


    I'm really enjoying this build thread, particularly all the superb photographs...thank you!


    I am looking forward to your rigging phase, which is fast approaching from the looks of things, and how you use those excellent blocks you developed a wonderful technique for making.


    I have just a single question about the stove pipe...I would imagine you would want the pipe opening facing aft so as not to catch spray and what not as the vessel works in the seaway. Just a thought, mind you. ;)


    Really looking forward to more!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Hi, Radek! :)


    I am very sorry I missed that question too, but I doubt I could have suggested anything more useful as I haven't built a full hull yet anyway. :D


    I have seen the use of mastic as you call it, or putty of sorts, to fill the low spots, but not the use of newspaper scraps, so if you could show us a picture, that would be great.


    I do know that many times the hull plates get deformed when glued at each frame former, and I have seen some folks extend the hull plating across a few formers without using glue in between to avoid this distortion. Having never actually performed this feat, I can't say the pluses and minuses of the technique, but it seems to work very well for some. One problem is the underwater hull does not provide enough formers to make a smooth and faired hull...perhaps inserting something in between might help, such as foam or balsa wood spacers, and it might make the curve of the hull more fair for the final planking. Just some ideas for next time (and when I finally make a full hulled ship!).


    In any event, your ship is really looking great! I did not realize there was so much internal detail provided in this kit, what with the Captian's cabin and such...awesome!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Hi, Rob! :)


    Wow!! 8o


    Rob, I always figure on an awesome build when your name is involved in the build thread, but this is absolutely outstanding! I know you said the fit is superb, and the detailed graphics brilliant, but somehow I think your magic in making paper models has a part in this. ;) I'm glad to hear your finger is on the mend, mate!


    I am excited that this is going to be available from Mike, and on December 20th...oh, yeah, this is going to be on the wish list for Christmas...you better get that bandwidth thing going, Mike, I expect quite a few orders on this one!


    Looking forward to seeing more, Rob.


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Aw, no sheaves??? :D


    Seriously, exceptional job, Radek! I love your technique for stropping the blocks and running the thread for the gun tackles. They came out very well!


    Your cannon look great too!


    So, did you make the line (rope) yourself using that Lego rope machine? That's dedication! In any event, I really admire the way you are building this ship.


    Looking forward to further updates.


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Hello, Günter


    Many thanks for posting so many pictures of truly outstanding and inspirational models! =D> =D> =D>


    I am struck by the wonderful assortment of model types at this exhibit, and the little ones taking part in the fun. It looks like it was a superb meeting, with many models being shown...the next best thing to building models is to see so many excellent photos of outstanding models! :]


    Great job, and thanks for taking the time to post the report with a great number of photographs.


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Wotcher, Rob! :)


    Really nice looking crane...I don't mind the photos at all, everything looks like that to me after a long day at work. :D Good thing I'm not a surgeon. 8o


    I like the idea of soaking the card in CA to harden it up. I saw someone use an acrylic floor polish to get a similar effect, which I think has less harmful fumes. That's one of the things I don't like about CA. Way back when I was working on wood models I tended to use CA a lot, not knowing better, and I ended up with asthma as a result. The fumes do a real bad thing to your lungs if you don't watch it, so very good ventilation is a must! But it probably is one of the best things to use to harden up card like that to enable you to make such nice, clean and close cuts...and you did a masterful job of cutting out all those little triangles for this crane. If you put a coat of paint on it I bet it's just as strong as one made of photoetching.


    Glad your finger is healing and getting better so we can be treated to more of this superb build!


    Looking forward to more, mate!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Well, Oliver, then you'll at least find plenty of mistakes in my build thread! :D


    I haven't posted any updates on Constitution lately as I am rebuilding the gangway cages on the main hatch. Having built those two first, then the remaining three on the after companionways, the first two just didn't look right. By the time I got to the last one I pretty much had a regular routine in building them...but the first ones stuck out in comparision...then it hit me...they're too small! In fact, as my friend mentioned when I showed him the model, "Are those ammo shuttle cages? They look kinda small for someone to crawl under to go below...", and, although it pained me to take a few steps back in the build, I had to admit he was right, and it was too obvious, so out they came! But as I see it, that's part of the fun in building models, you hopefully learn something from the mistakes that are made...trouble with me is remembering them for the next build. :D


    Looking forward to more!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Hi, Oliver! :)


    Jeez, how did I miss this thread before?? ?(


    As Leif did a little while ago, having found your magnificent thread I am now back tracking a bit to try and catch up. This is a wonderfully instructive and entertaining thread! I love the many tips and techniques you describe, the excellent photos and wonderful writing style that makes it an absolute treat to read. There is a lot to be learned from this thread, so I hope you don't mind if I stick around awhile and just take a few peeks over your shoulder...I promise I won't get in the way. :D


    Oh, and your ship is just plain fantastic! ;)


    Superb job, Oliver!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Hi, my friends! :)


    @ John, how are you, mate? Thanks so much for the very kind words, I'm a middling modeler compared to the rest of the gang here, but I do have fun trying to enhance this kit...slow process, as I've mentioned, as I am doing a bit of trial and error, but that's the fun in it as I see it.
    That's not a bad idea, actually, sizing up a gun station. You remember the combat station kit that was out there? No reason it can't be done in paper, no reason at all...just takes a bit of forethought and desire, and it can be yours. :)


    @ Leif, my friend, I can think of no other person who would manage to make an outstanding model of the boat, but do stay in your larger scale...I really think you should give it a go. If you want, I do have a set of plans for the ships boats that might be helpful in starting out. If you want, you can try it at a smaller scale too. :)


    @ Oliver: you are right, my dear Sir, Constellation in Boston is actually an 1854 "newly" designed sloop of war, not the original frigate from the original frigates under the Act of 1794 which gave birth to the U.S. Navy. Mind you, a very beautiful ship, she is, but I think the Baltimore conservers have finally admitted the history of their ship is not what what originally claimed.


    @ Jörg: It really pleases me that my little ship causes such wonderful memories for you. I have a very similar experience. For Father's day a few years ago my wife entered the lottery they have for the turn-about cruise they have in Charlestown every 4th of July...now, mind you, having a particular affection for this ship for many, many years, I have entered that lottery every year for the last ten or so years, and was never lucky enough to be chosen. My wife, however, in addition to entering the lottery apparently wrote to the Constitution crew and explained to them my love of this ship and, well, she of course got us two tickets as honored guests for that year's cruise. Well, you can imagine I was like a kid in a candy shop with a pocket full of money! I took quite a few pictures (adding to my already substantial collection), but of all sorts of details, and was floating a few feet off the ground for months! I don't know how to explain it, but this ship just brings out such emotions in those who are lucky enough to see her in person, and I am proud to admit I am one of them. She is truly a national treasure, whose importance is only enhanced when you begin to learn a bit more about her and her history. I have been doing that, on and off, for about 28 years now.


    And that, my dear friends, is a part of why I love this ship and am so very happy to build this little model. My joy is heightened by your very kind words of encouragement and expressions of the delight in following my build thread. I do thank you all, and hope you continue to enjoy with me the fun I am having in building her.


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Hi, Rob! :)


    Yeow! That picture of your finger had me cringing a bit...too many memories of the abuse I subjected my knuckles and fingers to over the years. 8o


    I can't wait until you start up with the crane...just looking at the two pictures I can see the finer lines, correct color, etc., your re-draw provides. This is going to be a super build, I just know it!


    Glad you're back, mate.


    Oh, and more photos when you can, please. ;)


    Cheers!


    Jim

    I agree, Leif. There's just something about the way Raimund has done the edging that brings out the beautiful print even more so. He commented earlier about learning this technique a while ago, but it really comes across so very well in this build. Not to mention the fine work he is doing with the blocks and steering gear.


    I would also like a clear translation of the block making technique. I think I understand a bit of it, thanks to the illustration, but I just want to be sure how he sets up the lamination to keep the holes for the line open...I gather that is the brilliant green circles in the diagram. I have been brain storming on a similar set up for my Constitution but haven't actually made up any blocks yet, but I love the way Raimund's have come out. In my as of yet untried technique, the blocks are made up side by side with the holes running along the length of the strip. It's a little different but not so much so...maybe just a little bit smaller. ;)


    Superb job, Raimund! Although I don't post comments everyday, I do visit and love seeing this ship develop so very nicely.


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Thanks, Leif! :)


    I was able to get a little bit more done this weekend, but instead of working on the starboard hammock nettings, I wanted to finish up one of the boats that I needed to install on the main deck hatch gratings. The 36 foot pinnace is the larger of the four boats carried by the ship today; actually, since 1996 she is not even found on the ship, but kept ashore. I thought having it lashed to the main hatch gratings always gave a bit more interest to that area of the ship, so I decided to install it on my model.


    I used the kit's parts, to some extent, in building her, but I opted to add a bit of detail to what the kit provided. I ignored the one piece top that has printed benches, all of the wrong color (yellow?) and built up the flooring first, added the benches and made some oars to sit in the boat. I also made up the rudder, which is also stowed in the boat, in the stern area. I added a keel and stem and gunnuls with oar locks.


    I then created the chocks and keel supports on the gratings, added the eyebolts used to lash the boat down and finally made up the strongbacks which are the wooden planks that lie across the top of the boat and used with the lashing to secure her in place. Here is the end result:


    [Blocked Image: http://img247.imageshack.us/img247/6816/36footpinnaceinstalledonmainha2.jpg]


    Here's another view which I hope shows the oars and rudder, as well as the lashing arrangement:


    [Blocked Image: http://img247.imageshack.us/img247/5521/anotherviewofpinnaceonmainhatc.jpg]


    Perhaps this view shows the gear in the boat a bit better:


    [Blocked Image: http://img247.imageshack.us/img247/7379/36footpinnaceinstalledonmainha1.jpg]


    I could have done a better job on the hull of this little boat, and next time I wouldn't use the kit parts as they seem to distort the actual shape of the boat a bit.


    Anyway, that's it for tonight.
    Thanks for stopping by and having a look.


    Cheers!


    Jim

    And here are a few more shots to show how this worked.
    [Blocked Image: http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/8438/foreporthammocknettinginboardv.jpg]


    [Blocked Image: http://img358.imageshack.us/img358/5852/hammocknettingsonportforwardra.jpg]


    Now I can work on the starboard side, and finally the two quarterdeck hammock nets.


    Thank you for all the suggestions given on how to tackle this problem.
    I hope you enjoy the end result.
    Thanks for stopping by and having a look.


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Greetings, my friends!
    Well, I finally found what I think is the answer to my hammock netting source...and in the most unlikely place! Among the many small shops in downtown New York City are these small shops that sell all sorts of cheap wares. I happened to be walking by just one such shop and spotted a cheap sheer black scarf...truth be known, I had eyed a similar scarf one of the young ladies at work was wearing, although it was the wrong color and had a printed pattern on it...or else I might have borrowed that one! But, that gave me the idea.


    Anyway, this is a photo of the scarf...the tattered edge is evidence of my having already started to cut it into strips.
    [Blocked Image: http://img362.imageshack.us/img362/8181/sheerscarf3lt.jpg]


    Because of the weave pattern I needed, I had to trim it at a bias to create the criss-cross effect of the hammock netting.
    [Blocked Image: http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/791/sheermaterialcutatabiasforprop.jpg]


    I then cut it into thin strips to fit the hammock irons.
    [Blocked Image: http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/9020/sheermaterialcutinstripsforham.jpg]


    I'm pretty happy with the end result, which has just the right amount of weave, and small enough thread to match the scale.
     [Blocked Image: http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/6273/hammocknettingsinstalledonforw.jpg]

    Hallo, Jürgen! :)


    Ich genieße wirklich, diese Updates, besonders mit allen wundervollen kleinen Details lesend, die Sie verursachen. Ich muß sagen, daß Ihre Zutat von einigen jener kleinen Teile wirklich hervorragend ist!


    Sie wird mit jedem Update schöner. Dank für die Eintragung so vieler wundervoller Fotos Ihres Baus, ist es wirklich eine Inspiration!


    Beifall!
    Jim


    :usenglish:
    Hello, Jürgen! :)


    I am really enjoying reading these updates, particularly with all the wonderful little details you are creating. I must say your trimming of some of those small parts is truly outstanding!


    She is becoming more beautiful with each update.


    Thanks for posting so many wonderful photos of your build, it is really an inspiration!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Ausgezeichnet, Herbert!


    Ihre kleine Kreation ist gerade fantastisch! Sie konnten Mikro, schiff in das vorbildliche Entwerfen einzusteigen erwägen wünschen :)


    Ein anderes Paar großartige Schiff Modelle!
    Dank für das Teilen der Fotos.


    Wärmster Respekt,
    Jim


    :usenglish:
    Excellent, Herbert!


    Your little creation is just fantastic! You might want to consider going into micro ship model designing. :)


    Another pair of superb ship models!
    Thanks for sharing the photos.


    Warmest regards,
    Jim

    Hervorragend, Herbert! =D> =D> =D>


    Ein großartiger Bau und ein wundervoller Vergleich! Ich erkenne, dass die große Arkona vom MDK ist, doch woher kommt die kleine Arcona ?


    Großartige Modelle! Danke für das Teilen dieser Fotos mit uns !


    Beifall!


    Jim


    :usenglish:
    Outstanding, Herbert! =D> =D> =D>


    A superb build and wonderful comparison!
    I figure the large Arkona is from MDK, but where does the smaller one come from?


    Great models! Thanks for sharing these photos!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Greet technique, Raimund! Now I understand why your photos show a very clean and nicely defined construction; the use of a darker color for the edges really provides a visually attractive result.


    Superb photos, my friend! And an outstanding build!


    Looking forward to more! :]


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Hello, my friends!


    @ Oliver: Great idea, I will have to take a look and see what they have. I will probably also take a trip to the local fabric store and see how small they make that material for wedding veils...I have netting that is just right for a larger scale, 1/96, but at 1/250 it's a little more difficult finding the right stuff with the correct weave pattern (small, evenly spaced square holes).


    @Barry: Bazzer, the same place I found that enormous penny! :D


    Michael and Jürgen: Thank you very much, I am very greatful for the kind words, and especially from the folks here at Kartonbau whose work I deeply admire and enjoying seeing...it does mean a lot to me.


    @Leif: Thanks, I'm very happy you enjoy seeing my updates, and I truly appreciate your expression of how they make you feel for I have the same joy watching how your Bounty is coming along, ,as I've mentioned on your build thread. Yes sir, I utilized a very "advanced" technique to make the fife rail stanchions...wire and globs of PVA glue. ;) On the mizzen fife rail I might try to add a little more to those gobs, break it up into two or more separate turnings in the middle, more like the way it is on the actual ship...trouble is you can never predict how the glob will react when you play with them as they set. The four stanchions in the picture which are attached to the paper strips are supposed to be for the mizzen fife rail, but now that I figured out how to make them, it's really so easy, I might just try making another set and see how I can play with the additional turnings, just to see how difficult it is...I still have those four in case it doesn't work out, right? ;)


    Thanks again for stopping by, my friends!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Here's a few more views of the hammock irons so far:


    [Blocked Image: http://img493.imageshack.us/img493/8279/anotherviewofforedeckporthammo.jpg]


    [Blocked Image: http://img493.imageshack.us/img493/7831/viewofforwardportsidehammockir.jpg]


    I'm trying to figure out the best material to use for the netting. I've toyed with dark panty hose nylons, which I stretched over a frame and sprayed with matte clear acrylic, but when I trimmed them up for the netting it just didn't look right because of the weave which, when you trim down the nylon, is much more pronounced than when looking at the fabric as a whole. I might have to settle on that even though the weave is not right, but I will continue to look for something else in the meantime, maybe a different type of stocking has a finer weave.


    Meanwhile, here's a final view of the foredeck showing another perspective of the hammock irons:


    [Blocked Image: http://img493.imageshack.us/img493/9573/viewofforwardportsidehammockir1.jpg]


    I hope you enjoyed this update. Thanks for stopping by!


    Cheers!


    Jim

    Here's a few more views of the installed fife rail:
    [Blocked Image: http://img493.imageshack.us/img493/1883/anotherviewofmainmastfiferaili.jpg]
    [Blocked Image: http://img493.imageshack.us/img493/3791/viewofmainfiferailinstalledloo.jpg]


    In this view you might be able to see the bulleyes I installed before putting in the fife rail, which will be used for some of the stay rigging, and some eyebolts for other rigging to be added later.
    [Blocked Image: http://img493.imageshack.us/img493/4784/mainmastfiferailinstalledshowi.jpg]


    While working out the mizzen fiferail, I figured I would start with the forward hammock netting irons. These are not mentioned in the original kit at all, but they are another distinctive feature that just has to be added. I used small wires to form the irons, and they fit along the cap rail with the hammock boards on each end. I then glued a bit of paint stiffened silk across the top of the hammock irons, which will be the top of the hammock netting to be added later.
    [Blocked Image: http://img493.imageshack.us/img493/5938/portsideforedeckhammocknetting.jpg]

    Hello, my friends! :)


    Well, I was able to get just a little bit done this week...actually building the fife rails was a bit involved and took a bit of time, so I was able to finish just the main fife rail so far.


    I used parts from the kit, but I adjusted the spacing of the rails to fit the actual configuration used on the ship (the kit has them too close together, and too wide). They also have the incorrect spacing for the belaying pins, so I had to eye-ball them so they would not fall into the stanchions underneath. :rolleyes:


    This is a photo of the finished main mast fife rail. The belaying pins are cut from small wire and glued into the holes I made...yes, I know they are not all uniform sizes, but that's a result of my bad eyesight. I hope you don't mind their irregularity.
    [Blocked Image: http://img167.imageshack.us/img167/1631/mainmastfiferailcompletednov62.jpg]


    Next is an example of how the stanchions were built up. The kit calls for a tall box, which is not right, so I was forced to improvise a bit. There is a shorth length of wire for the core, with paper strips on the ends for the top and bottom parts, and glue was added to the middle to impart a bit of shaped to it. The original has a more elaborate shape than I was able to create, but it gives the impression I was trying for.
    [Blocked Image: http://img167.imageshack.us/img167/8514/fiferailstanchionsunderconstru.jpg]


    And here is the main mast fife rail installed:
    [Blocked Image: http://img167.imageshack.us/img167/1708/mainmastfiferailinstallednov62.jpg]

    Outstanding job on the rudder, Raimund! =D> =D> =D>


    I know some of the parts of this kit can be very difficult to tackle, and the windlass and now the rudder is one of them. However, there is something about your style of construction that makes such a difficult job look so easy...don't know how you do it...but I'm glad you are and that you give us such an amazing treat by posting progress photos of your work.


    Thanks, and keep those photos coming!


    Cheers!


    Jim