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fuchsjos

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41

Tuesday, October 16th 2007, 8:13am

Hello John!

Although I am not a specialist for architecture models, I look at your building reports from time to time. The very clean and accurate technology, which you use, pleases me. In addition the results of your work are charming masterpieces and a feast for the eyes.
The solution for the figuration of domes with the turning woodpiece pleases me much - make it exactly the same. However I use still another small piece of tissue paper to stick the dome on the form (without stick down the wood with the paper). See also:

ISU-152 / Modelik / 1:25 - FERTIG!

Love of greetings
Josef
Stell' Dir vor da ist ein Forum ... und keiner schreibt was!

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42

Tuesday, October 16th 2007, 2:08pm

Thank You!

Dear Josef,

I am honoured and pleased that you have commented on my architectural builds. Thank you.

In closing cone shapes, I knew that there was something missing from my technique. The segments want to spring back and have to be held in place until they stick. (I do not glue the segments to the wood - I keep the cone above the wood so it won't stick. But then I'm trying to hold segments steady until the glue dries unsupported.

You method is brilliant. The tissue provides full contact with the segments! I am going to try to use the translator to figure out how you get the tissue cone off the wooden template form without sticking. Shape with just water?

There is a lot of cone forming on the turrets and towers of Chambord Josef. I must learn how to use your technique.

I'm learning from The Master,
Thank you again Josef,
John

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43

Tuesday, October 16th 2007, 2:43pm

Dear John,

once again fascinating to see how you build this model! There is always great care how you make the parts and add the enforcements.

Looking forward to see the finished castle.

Best wishes,

Matthias

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44

Tuesday, October 16th 2007, 2:48pm

Josef,

Am I correct with this summary of closing a cone?
(following the photos of making the shell projectile)

1. Make a wooden form.
2. Encase the form with one layer of tissue.
3. Use diluted glue (such as white glue + water) to coat the tissue
4. Tool the tissue into shape on the form. While doing this rotate the form often to prevent the tissue
from sticking to the wooden form. (?)
5. Remove the newly created tissue mold and set aside.
6. Slip the cylinder with the segmented top over the wooden form. Gently spread the segments open like
the petals of a flower.
7. Place the tissue mold onto the wooden form and slide down to the base of the segments.
8. Moisten the segments with glue and tool them closed around the tissue liner.

John

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45

Tuesday, October 16th 2007, 3:07pm

Hello Matthias,

Thank you! Good to hear from you. The sun is shining here in Peterborough, but it's a bit chilly. (3 degrees Celsius) Fall is approaching on horseback.

Chambord has much to offer. Many of the French models in this chateau series use small, delicate parts that are difficult to cut out without losing some of their detail. (e.g. finials) Other large parts such as courtyards or terraces depend on light flimsy underpinnings. The countless chimneys and dormers often do not have the correct pitch angle. They often lean forward.

Having said that, the models are delightful to view when completed. They are both challenging and fun to build. And, as you know, the history they hold adds to the enjoyment of researching them.

Cheers...John

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46

Tuesday, October 16th 2007, 4:07pm

Thank you John!

Autumn is also slowly coming its way to Tokyo, though it is still rather warm here with 15 C in the morning and some rain dropping on the windows tonight.

I had seen many of the L'Instant Durable models while living in France. It is a nice idea to offer the paper models in museums shops and other shops close by the originals. Building the models tells you much more about the architecture and the dimensions of the entire construction than just looking at pictures. It is a good education tool as well to make kids/people thing about the time and the history of the people who lived and worked in the place.

Unfortunately L'Instant Durable never made a model of the Strasbourg Munster other than a postcard. It would have gone well with their other churches in 1:250

Best wishes,

Matthias

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47

Tuesday, October 16th 2007, 6:42pm

Dear Matthias,

I agree with you that building these historically significant structures makes one much more aware of their scale. I also agree that they are very useful for educational purposes. If I were still in the classroom, I would have them on display and be using them to enrich many programs. As a matter of fact, I will be approaching the local high schools and offering to bring in specific models to enhance curricula.

Cheers...John

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48

Tuesday, October 16th 2007, 8:35pm

Hello Stephan,

I apologize for not acknowledging your earlier post. Thank you. Yes, there are many chimneys on Chambord's roofs. When I get into them, I'll let you know the model's count.

Cheers...John

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49

Wednesday, October 17th 2007, 7:56am

RE: Thank You!

Quoted

Original von John
Dear Josef,

I am honoured and pleased that you have commented on my architectural builds. Thank you.

In closing cone shapes, I knew that there was something missing from my technique. The segments want to spring back and have to be held in place until they stick. (I do not glue the segments to the wood - I keep the cone above the wood so it won't stick. But then I'm trying to hold segments steady until the glue dries unsupported.

You method is brilliant. The tissue provides full contact with the segments! I am going to try to use the translator to figure out how you get the tissue cone off the wooden template form without sticking. Shape with just water?

There is a lot of cone forming on the turrets and towers of Chambord Josef. I must learn how to use your technique.

I'm learning from The Master,
Thank you again Josef,
John


Dear John,

Thank you for the kind words ... :rotwerd:

My buildingreports (with description of the technics) you can find also there in english:

http://forum.zealot.com/t138259-2/

I'm not sure that the translation of tissue is correct. In german it would be 'Seidenpapier' direct translated into silkpaper. It is a very thin, but strong paper, used to cover bouquet of flowers or as package for chinaware and tableware.Look also here:

http://www.modulor.de/shop/oxid.php/sid/…rchparam/tissue

Your later written description of the procedur is correct!
To point 4: You can also use some wax to save the wood from sticking to the tissue mold.
To point 5: It is not necessary to remove the tissue before making the cylinder.

Kindly regards
Josef
Stell' Dir vor da ist ein Forum ... und keiner schreibt was!

This post has been edited 4 times, last edit by "fuchsjos" (Oct 17th 2007, 8:08am)


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50

Wednesday, October 17th 2007, 4:31pm

RE: Thank You!

Dear Josef,

Thank you for clarrification. I will search out the flower tissue paper.

In the meantime, I decided to use the mold like the tissue. On the next tower, I cut it off, drilled a hole in its end and glued it up.
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51

Thursday, October 18th 2007, 2:16am

When rolling cylinders of small diameter, twist drills come in handy. They offer easy sizing and simplify butt glueing the edges.
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52

Thursday, October 18th 2007, 2:34am

One of the most distinctive features of the Loire Valley Chateaux is the ornate finial that adorns dormer facades and chimney tops. A magnifying glass and a very sharp pointed knife helps when cutting them.

A chimney top...
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53

Thursday, October 18th 2007, 2:35am

A dormer facade...
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54

Thursday, October 18th 2007, 2:36am

A band of ornamentation...
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55

Thursday, October 18th 2007, 2:39am

Bring these elements together with the turret itself and you have a very visually attractive assembly.
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56

Thursday, October 18th 2007, 2:47am

Rotating the assembly...
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57

Thursday, October 18th 2007, 2:47am

...and again.
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58

Thursday, October 18th 2007, 1:57pm

Second Tower Turret

Here are the turret parts en Français, pour Caroline de Berry Tower.
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59

Thursday, October 18th 2007, 9:22pm

RE: Thank You!

Quoted

Originally posted by fuchsjos

Quoted

Original von John

...I'm not sure that the translation of tissue is correct. In german it would be 'Seidenpapier' direct translated into silkpaper. It is a very thin, but strong paper, used to cover bouquet of flowers or as package for chinaware and tableware...

Kindly regards
Josef


Greetings from Toronto!

I've been following your architectural builds from the wings for a couple of months, now. They are very inspiring, particularly the one on Reims, which really caught my attention. I haven't picked it up, yet, but I was able to find Chartres. Some day I'll begin to tackle it.

I think the paper Josef is talking about is called Japanese tissue here in Canada. You should be able to find it in a hobby shop that caters to balsa wood flying airplane models, such as those made by Guillow's.

Cheers,
Mike :prost:
Why take Life seriously? You'll never get out of it alive!

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60

Thursday, October 18th 2007, 10:25pm

amazing!!!!! each parts is build perfect.

=D> =D> =D> =D> =D> =D> x 10

waltair
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61

Friday, October 19th 2007, 12:57am

Hello Mike.
Nice to see a fellow Ontarian here! This is a wonderful forum Mike. Welcome aboard.
Thanks for the tip about the tissue.

Hi Walter,
Thank you for your 'over the top' comments. A nice thing about posting on this forum is that you can pick and choose the photos that give the best impression. It's easy to trash the ones that show the goofs.

Here are the assembled pieces for the Henri V turret.
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62

Friday, October 19th 2007, 9:33pm

I like the fact that the chimneys and dormer facades extend right down to the bottom of the turret. It is easy to get them standing plumb. They also help contain and register the roof cone.
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63

Friday, October 19th 2007, 10:25pm

Hello Stephan,
I wonder if they count the number of chimneys by the number of flues in the masonry chimney stack. I do not see the high number you mentioned. In each turret I see only three large flues. Perhaps the one that has a roof over it contains a number of flues that vent out around the edge of the chimney roof. Don't know.

The name of the game with this model seems to be to get all the verticals standing properly. In this photo, the base of the lower chimney block on the left is tipping outward. It's being pushed by the roof.
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This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "John" (Oct 19th 2007, 11:21pm)


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64

Friday, October 19th 2007, 11:19pm

Saran Wrap

Dear Josef,

I was unsuccessful in my first attempt to find the tissue you mentioned. In the meantime, I came upon the idea of using Saran Wrap (plastic wrap). It worked well, but unlike your method, the Saran Wrap stays on the wooden mold. I think your method is superior. The tissue would cleanly release with the dome firmly attached.

Mike, a new member on the forum suggested searching the tissue at a hobby store where they sell balsa wood airplanes.

Thanks again,
John
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This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "John" (Oct 19th 2007, 11:20pm)


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65

Tuesday, October 23rd 2007, 5:13pm

The Turrets

It has taken quite a bit of time to complete the four tower tops. They are almost complete little models in themselves. Here they are.
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66

Tuesday, October 23rd 2007, 5:15pm

François I Tower

Here is the first completed tower - François I tower with its turret rising above the terrace.
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67

Tuesday, October 23rd 2007, 5:16pm

RE: François I Tower

From another angle...
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68

Tuesday, October 23rd 2007, 5:19pm

RE: François I Pavilion

But the turret of François I tower is not really complete yet. Joined to it is its pavilion. Here is its footrpint...
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69

Tuesday, October 23rd 2007, 5:28pm

RE: François I Pavilion

Perhaps I should have begun Chambord before October. Now each pavilion will require the same amount of work to make its chimneys, dormers and towers. Who's complaining? This is our hobby and passion - right?
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70

Tuesday, October 23rd 2007, 10:32pm

5.KBW - Chambord, L'Instant Durable, 1:300

Quoted

Who's complaining? This is our hobby and passion - right?


:genau:right :genau:

Cheers, Herbert

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Friday, October 26th 2007, 3:01pm

The Pavilions

One down, three to go.
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72

Friday, October 26th 2007, 4:04pm

RE: The Pavilions

You get a better overview of the construction when you see the whole baseplate of Chambord.
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73

Friday, October 26th 2007, 4:05pm

RE: The Pavilions

Here are three photos of the François I tower attached to its pavilion.
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74

Saturday, October 27th 2007, 2:52am

Sorry John,

but I have to disrupt your nice report to say that this is wonderful work!

It will be a beautiful model of a magnificent castle.

Have a nice weekend,

Matthias

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "MHBS" (Oct 27th 2007, 2:53am)


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75

Saturday, October 27th 2007, 4:24am

John:

That's such incredibly precise, beautiful work. Your contruction reports are very instructuve, not to mention inspiring.

David
Froberger

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76

Saturday, October 27th 2007, 10:41pm

Mathias and David.

Thanks for the positive comments gentlemen. Photographing the model, describing its construction and discussing various techniques, for me, is as interesting as the build itself.

Chambord is taking far more time than I thought it would. Another week should complete the donjon or keep.

Work continues on the second pavilion...
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77

Sunday, October 28th 2007, 6:50pm

Two errors surfaced with the construction of the second pavilion. One white dormer roof footprint was much too large for the roof, and another roof was impossible to put in place as folded. In the first case, the white patch was painted in and in the second, the part had to be cut into pieces and completely rebuilt.

In these pictures, the two pavilions and the staircase lantern are in place.
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78

Sunday, October 28th 2007, 6:55pm

The donjon from the back and above...
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79

Sunday, October 28th 2007, 6:59pm

The Staircase Lantern

Acutal photo courtesy of Ludwig.
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80

Sunday, October 28th 2007, 7:02pm

Two more pavilions to build and I can break out of this donjon. I'm eager to move on to new challenges with the east and west wings with their galleries, staircases and arcades.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "John" (Oct 29th 2007, 3:42pm)


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