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Donnerstag, 27. Oktober 2005, 05:13

USS Constitution / WHV / 1:250

Hello, my friends!

Here is a model that I have been working on for a while now. The original build thread is on the Cardmodels.net forum here:
http://www.cardmodels.net/forum/showthread.php?t=818

I mistakenly titled it 1/200 scale, while it is actually 1/250, as most WHV kits are. The idea of this build was to take the WHV kit and enhance it to build a model as closely as I could to the actual ship which is presently in Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA. This is one of my favorite ships, one I have made a hobby to study for over thirty years. I am lucky to have collected a large amount of information, photos, plans, etc., which have helped in my attempt to improve upon this kit a bit. I will provide updates here as I think it is interesting to see how the basic kit can be modified a bit, and maybe some of the ideas will be found useful by others.

This is were I am so far:



One of the big differences in my build and the original kit is the modification of the head rail area, where I have opened up the rails, compared to the closed and simplified method used by the kit designers. This is how I did the head rails:



I also completely rebuilt the quarter galleries, as the simplified method used by the kit did not give her the appearance I think is rather striking. This photo from earlier in the construction I hope shows what I am referring to:



I also had some fun adding details that the kit just does not provide. One is the cathead:



I also enhanced the transom quite a bit, rather than just settle for the printed kit part:



I also added a bit more detail to the parts, such as the charley noble (smoke stack) fife rails and pin rails, etc., as well as rigging and building the cannons and carronades like the original:



I also have added the brass cages (made of wire and silk thread) like on the original, which the kit just does not provide for, and detailed the helm, added binnacles more true to the original and the skylight with the proper build, colors and the protective rail:





Here is a close-up of the skylight on the quarterdeck with the rail:



I hope to update this thread as I continue in the build, but it is a slow process due to the minimal free time I have to spend enjoying this build...but slowly but surely it will continue, and I hope you will enjoy seeing her develop as I go along.

Thanks for stopping by and taking a look.

Cheers!

Jim

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Donnerstag, 27. Oktober 2005, 09:21

Hello Jim & Connie! How nice to see you all over here. Hope you made the passage alright...

Leif
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Donnerstag, 27. Oktober 2005, 09:36

Jim,

Great to see you here! Looks like Connie is none the worst for wear. Now when do you suppose the rigging will begin?

-Gil
I got carded!

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Donnerstag, 27. Oktober 2005, 19:57

Viel Dank, Meine Freunde!!

I'm glad you enjoyed my first build post, and I look forward to sharing updates as I continue with her.

@ Jörg: If you talk to my wife, she'll complain that it is more like an obsession, but I like to think of it more as a very acute interest. :D

@ Lief: It was a very enjoyable trip! I check in here many times a week and always admire the superb work I see here, very inspirational and always enjoyable to see. I see my mate Barry has a few threads, so, if the members don't mind my use of English (I fear my attempts at translation in the past have been horrible) I would enjoy sharing some posts with my friends here.

@ Gil: Thanks, she has survived fairly well in her sadly incomplete state. :) I need to finish up a few odds and ends on the hull, then build all of the masts and yards, etc., before I actually start to tie some knots. I should really start to build some of those deadeyes and blocks now if I expect to finish her in my life time. ;)

@ Michael: Thanks, Michael, great to be here! I appreciate the very generous words. If it weren't for my magnifiers that fit on my reading glasses (yep, I need two sets of lens just to see the parts with my bad eyesight) and remembering to rest my hands on the work board to keep them from shaking too much, I wouldn't be able to do a thing. If you saw the earlier version of the skylight in the Cardmodels.net site you saw a great example of what happens when my hands are unsupported...those "brass" bars were all over the place! :rolleyes:

Cheers!

Jim

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Donnerstag, 27. Oktober 2005, 23:02

I've just read the Thread-title: USS constitution
And knowing that there's a famous sailingship inside.
Great Work! I'll trace this thread for incoming details.
When I was 8-10 years old i've biuild the constitution
in plastic. Was just like airplanes or cars or so.
But my energy went to the rigging. Inside was a rigging plan.
And i set up the rig with knots - not glue.
Thats why i know the Constitution.

Amazing model you are setting up.

Greets
_____________
Stephan
___________________________________________________
Kreativität beginnt im Kopf - und macht sich dann auf den Weg.
2DO
im Bau: Gastons Fiat 509
Konstruktion: Fokker T-5
Konstruktion: Der Dom zu Trier - Auf Eis gelegt

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Donnerstag, 27. Oktober 2005, 23:27

Hi Jim

Its a little work of art and love, even more so when you look at the size of it.
I have been looking over the 1/100 scale connie you sent me and it will be hard at that scale never mind 1/250. Keep at it me old mate and I look forward to the next post of how she is doing.

Take care and more soon I hope

Rob

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Freitag, 28. Oktober 2005, 01:28

Hey Jim - that is really an oustanding build! Glad to see it featured here as well. Now about all those brass rails - where they part of Old Ironsides in 1812, or are those later additions?

They're a wonderful addition to the kit, though I'd love to hear what Preserved Killick would have said about these "Oceans of brass" ;)

Cheers,


Oliver
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Freitag, 28. Oktober 2005, 02:01

I must say I am quite taken by the wonderful reaction to this thread, and thank you all for your most generous comments about my little ship. Coming from such an accomplished group of superb modelers your kind words mean so very much to me...thank you! :)

Permit me to digress just a bit and explain the configuration of this particular model. As most may know, the Constitution has been around since 1797 when she was launched in Charlestown, MA, not far from where she presently resides. The appearance, however, was substantially different from what she looks like today and, actually, she has evolved quite a bit over the years due to changes in her battery, her sail plan, rigging and various modifications to her hull. Exploring these evolutions over the years is what has lead my wife to label me obsessive when it comes to researching Constitution...it is an interesting and amazing study which not many vessels provide.

This leads me to the question posed by Oliver; the brass railings that encircle the quarterdeck skylight. In fact, not only where there no such railings in 1812 there wasn't even a skylight! One of the problems that one encounters when trying to build a model of Constitution reflective of her 1812 appearance is that the ship today is in so many ways different from her 1812 configuration, a large part of that occurred due to the restoration work in 1929. When the ship was singled out for preservation the edict from Congress required that she be restored to her appearance in 1812-1815. Unfortunately, those in charge of making up the plans for her restoration were mislead by mis-information and lack of proper research on her 1812 appearance. Moreso, a lot of the changes that occurred from 1870 onward were mistakenly interpreted as indicative of her 1812 appearance. One of the key pieces of evidence is found in the Peabody Salem museum in Massachusetts, where a model of Constitution built by the crew in 1812 can be found. That model has been verified as the most accurate representation of what she looked like in 1812, right down to the rigging scheme her crew faithfully recreated in the model. The model was made by the crew of Isaac Hull to celebrate her victory over the British frigate Guerrierre in July of 1812. Amazingly, the crew omitted the quarter davits and her wheel, apparently to reflect the loss of these items during the battle.

While I eventually plan on building another model (or more) of Constitution out of paper to reflect her various evolutions (the most intriguing being her as launched appearance in 1797 and her later appearance during the Barbary Wars of 1803-06) I felt given the apparent basis of this kit being the 1929 restoration look it would not be too difficult as a first version/modification to build her as she looks today...besides, there are many photos and resources available for that configuration than, say, her earlier configurations.

I do apologize for the long-winded post on this arcane subject, but I figured it would help explain some of the things I have tried to do with this build and why she has many attributes that are foreign to those who might be more familiar with the 1812 appearance. By the way, if anyone is interested I wrote a short article that was supposed to be a series on the evolution of Constitution (I still plan to go forward with the next installment, but I had to reconstruct my data after a computer crash shortly after the first part was published), in which I wrote about her early appearance...if nothing else, it gives you an idea on how she evolved even in her early days. It can be found at this link as the Spring 2004 issue (Volume II, #1):
http://www.modelshipwrights.net/WtoW%20Download.htm

I again apologize for the length of this post but hope it is of some interest.

Thanks again for stopping by for a look at this thread.

Cheers!

Jim

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Montag, 7. November 2005, 00:20

Hello, my friends! :)

Well, I was able to get just a little bit done this week...actually building the fife rails was a bit involved and took a bit of time, so I was able to finish just the main fife rail so far.

I used parts from the kit, but I adjusted the spacing of the rails to fit the actual configuration used on the ship (the kit has them too close together, and too wide). They also have the incorrect spacing for the belaying pins, so I had to eye-ball them so they would not fall into the stanchions underneath. :rolleyes:

This is a photo of the finished main mast fife rail. The belaying pins are cut from small wire and glued into the holes I made...yes, I know they are not all uniform sizes, but that's a result of my bad eyesight. I hope you don't mind their irregularity.


Next is an example of how the stanchions were built up. The kit calls for a tall box, which is not right, so I was forced to improvise a bit. There is a shorth length of wire for the core, with paper strips on the ends for the top and bottom parts, and glue was added to the middle to impart a bit of shaped to it. The original has a more elaborate shape than I was able to create, but it gives the impression I was trying for.


And here is the main mast fife rail installed:

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Montag, 7. November 2005, 00:26

Here's a few more views of the installed fife rail:



In this view you might be able to see the bulleyes I installed before putting in the fife rail, which will be used for some of the stay rigging, and some eyebolts for other rigging to be added later.


While working out the mizzen fiferail, I figured I would start with the forward hammock netting irons. These are not mentioned in the original kit at all, but they are another distinctive feature that just has to be added. I used small wires to form the irons, and they fit along the cap rail with the hammock boards on each end. I then glued a bit of paint stiffened silk across the top of the hammock irons, which will be the top of the hammock netting to be added later.

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Montag, 7. November 2005, 00:31

Here's a few more views of the hammock irons so far:





I'm trying to figure out the best material to use for the netting. I've toyed with dark panty hose nylons, which I stretched over a frame and sprayed with matte clear acrylic, but when I trimmed them up for the netting it just didn't look right because of the weave which, when you trim down the nylon, is much more pronounced than when looking at the fabric as a whole. I might have to settle on that even though the weave is not right, but I will continue to look for something else in the meantime, maybe a different type of stocking has a finer weave.

Meanwhile, here's a final view of the foredeck showing another perspective of the hammock irons:



I hope you enjoyed this update. Thanks for stopping by!

Cheers!

Jim

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Montag, 7. November 2005, 01:28

Jim - go to Michael's or some other kind of craft store and check out their ribbon department. They come in all sorts of styles and weaves.
I found some great black material for gratings etc. It's a square weave and looks just right for the scale. You'll see it when I get around to making some gratings on Oslyabya.

Cheers,

Oliver
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Montag, 7. November 2005, 02:26

Conny

Hi Jim

Where did you buy the enourmous pair of tweezers then ?

It is superb looks more like 1/100

regards
barry

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Montag, 7. November 2005, 12:35

Hello Jim,
your ship is a feast for the eyes. One can already imagine that she is starting oparations very soon. All these little details – what an outstanding work. I am looking foreward to see more.
Take care
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Montag, 7. November 2005, 12:53

My mood picks up considerably watching this great little ship come to live. What on earth did you use for those little thingamujigs with pins in them? The pins, I get, but the rest - are they really rounded, those little supports? Can't be card, can they? Looks like little chess pieces to me.

Anyways, like I said, I get happy just to watch it. And the photography is great.

Leif

PS (edited in): Should've read the text more closely before getting enthusiastic. Never mind, all the more reason for enthusiasm. Wire with glue blobs - good job, indeed!
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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16

Montag, 7. November 2005, 14:59

Hello, my friends!

@ Oliver: Great idea, I will have to take a look and see what they have. I will probably also take a trip to the local fabric store and see how small they make that material for wedding veils...I have netting that is just right for a larger scale, 1/96, but at 1/250 it's a little more difficult finding the right stuff with the correct weave pattern (small, evenly spaced square holes).

@Barry: Bazzer, the same place I found that enormous penny! :D

@Michael and Jürgen: Thank you very much, I am very greatful for the kind words, and especially from the folks here at Kartonbau whose work I deeply admire and enjoying seeing...it does mean a lot to me.

@Leif: Thanks, I'm very happy you enjoy seeing my updates, and I truly appreciate your expression of how they make you feel for I have the same joy watching how your Bounty is coming along, ,as I've mentioned on your build thread. Yes sir, I utilized a very "advanced" technique to make the fife rail stanchions...wire and globs of PVA glue. ;) On the mizzen fife rail I might try to add a little more to those gobs, break it up into two or more separate turnings in the middle, more like the way it is on the actual ship...trouble is you can never predict how the glob will react when you play with them as they set. The four stanchions in the picture which are attached to the paper strips are supposed to be for the mizzen fife rail, but now that I figured out how to make them, it's really so easy, I might just try making another set and see how I can play with the additional turnings, just to see how difficult it is...I still have those four in case it doesn't work out, right? ;)

Thanks again for stopping by, my friends!

Cheers!

Jim

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Montag, 7. November 2005, 15:25

The Bounty abolutely makes me happy too, Jim, but all credit for that must go to Raimund, you know...

Best, Leif
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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18

Montag, 7. November 2005, 15:30

Of course, you are right, Leif...time for another cup of coffee! 8o

Sorry about that, Raimund.
That's what I get for trying to write when my mind is still waking up.... :rolleyes:

Cheers!

Jim

19

Montag, 7. November 2005, 15:42

@jim

I wish you a very good morning - hope you'll get it better than over here 8) if you compare leif and me, he is the thin one and i am the more heavy one :D

greetings from austria
raimund

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20

Montag, 7. November 2005, 15:47

Hello Jim,


Considering the netting: my PC-loudspeakers have a grid for protection (Trust soundwave 240 3d) or the medical department has nicely woven bandages.
For radar-antenna's in the modelshop there are metal grids provided.

Nice Job! I am looking forward to further progress!

Congratulations,

from the Netherlands,

Gert
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Montag, 7. November 2005, 15:47

@ Raimund...and I, sadly and with much embarassment, am the one who makes the mistake of trying to write while half asleep and with VERY poor eyesight. :D

Cheers!

Jim

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22

Montag, 7. November 2005, 15:52

While we're on glue globs (say that three times fast!) ...

I find that I don't have the patience to build up layer upon layer of glue to get a shape like that. I mix baby powder into the glue, which gives it some "body" and requires fewer layers.


Cheers,


Oliver
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23

Montag, 7. November 2005, 21:15

Great tip, Oliver! :)

I have used talc to help fill in small holes quickly using CA as the adhesive medium, but never thought about using it with PVA.

Thanks!!
Jim

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24

Samstag, 12. November 2005, 03:56

Greetings, my friends!
Well, I finally found what I think is the answer to my hammock netting source...and in the most unlikely place! Among the many small shops in downtown New York City are these small shops that sell all sorts of cheap wares. I happened to be walking by just one such shop and spotted a cheap sheer black scarf...truth be known, I had eyed a similar scarf one of the young ladies at work was wearing, although it was the wrong color and had a printed pattern on it...or else I might have borrowed that one! But, that gave me the idea.

Anyway, this is a photo of the scarf...the tattered edge is evidence of my having already started to cut it into strips.


Because of the weave pattern I needed, I had to trim it at a bias to create the criss-cross effect of the hammock netting.


I then cut it into thin strips to fit the hammock irons.


I'm pretty happy with the end result, which has just the right amount of weave, and small enough thread to match the scale.

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25

Samstag, 12. November 2005, 04:01

And here are a few more shots to show how this worked.




Now I can work on the starboard side, and finally the two quarterdeck hammock nets.

Thank you for all the suggestions given on how to tackle this problem.
I hope you enjoy the end result.
Thanks for stopping by and having a look.

Cheers!

Jim

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26

Samstag, 12. November 2005, 13:53

Yes!

Leif
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27

Montag, 14. November 2005, 05:30

Thanks, Leif! :)

I was able to get a little bit more done this weekend, but instead of working on the starboard hammock nettings, I wanted to finish up one of the boats that I needed to install on the main deck hatch gratings. The 36 foot pinnace is the larger of the four boats carried by the ship today; actually, since 1996 she is not even found on the ship, but kept ashore. I thought having it lashed to the main hatch gratings always gave a bit more interest to that area of the ship, so I decided to install it on my model.

I used the kit's parts, to some extent, in building her, but I opted to add a bit of detail to what the kit provided. I ignored the one piece top that has printed benches, all of the wrong color (yellow?) and built up the flooring first, added the benches and made some oars to sit in the boat. I also made up the rudder, which is also stowed in the boat, in the stern area. I added a keel and stem and gunnuls with oar locks.

I then created the chocks and keel supports on the gratings, added the eyebolts used to lash the boat down and finally made up the strongbacks which are the wooden planks that lie across the top of the boat and used with the lashing to secure her in place. Here is the end result:



Here's another view which I hope shows the oars and rudder, as well as the lashing arrangement:



Perhaps this view shows the gear in the boat a bit better:



I could have done a better job on the hull of this little boat, and next time I wouldn't use the kit parts as they seem to distort the actual shape of the boat a bit.

Anyway, that's it for tonight.
Thanks for stopping by and having a look.

Cheers!

Jim

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28

Montag, 14. November 2005, 07:27

hi jim,

un-be-lie-va-ble ! this details at this scale - as you know the original you know exactly about all the details - and you add more and more of them in a quality far beyond the original kit. even 1:100 ships do not have more details.

greetings from austria
raimund

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29

Dienstag, 15. November 2005, 15:57

Thanks, Raimund and Michael!
I really appreciate your very kind and generous words, my friends!

I have to tell you, though, those two foot long tweezers are really heavy! :D

Cheers!

Jim

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Dienstag, 15. November 2005, 17:19

Oh, that little boat, within the little ship - you are making making me want, half seriously, to go your way, down intstead of up, in scale.

Leif
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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Dienstag, 15. November 2005, 17:37

RE: USS Constitution 1/250 scale WHV

Hi Jim,
I think our paths have crossed on ship modelling forums. I marvel at your work here. You do incredible things with paper! In a past life, I dreamed of building a 40 gun frigate. (Harold Underhill plans). Then it was downgraded to a brig of war. ("Irene") But I was in over my head and do not possess your skills.
Really enjoying this fantastic USS Constitution build.
Still dream of turned brass cannons on a planked quarterdeck every now and then.
Cheers...John

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Dienstag, 15. November 2005, 18:15

Compared to Old Ironsides, the Constellation is actually just a baby...

Take a look here http://www.constellation.org/

Not trying to be a wise-ass, just showing some Boston pride. ;)

Cheers,


Oliver
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Dienstag, 15. November 2005, 18:53

Zitat

Originally posted by Leif Ohlsson
Oh, that little boat, within the little ship - you are making making me want, half seriously, to go your way, down intstead of up, in scale.

Leif

Jim,
You have Leif thinking of dabbling in small scale again. Your work is the epitomy of small scale rendering. You know, I like Leif's idea of scaling up for some things. Take ship detail for example. Always thought it would be nice to bring the scale of a 24 pounder up to about three inches. Then you could really get into the gun tackle and carriage details. Maybe to do this, you would have to settle for a partial model of a specific section of deck. Can you imagine a fife's rail with stauntions and belaying pins built up in paper? What about blocks with actual sheeves in them? Leif would be at home here!
John

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Donnerstag, 17. November 2005, 04:25

Hi, my friends! :)

@ John, how are you, mate? Thanks so much for the very kind words, I'm a middling modeler compared to the rest of the gang here, but I do have fun trying to enhance this kit...slow process, as I've mentioned, as I am doing a bit of trial and error, but that's the fun in it as I see it.
That's not a bad idea, actually, sizing up a gun station. You remember the combat station kit that was out there? No reason it can't be done in paper, no reason at all...just takes a bit of forethought and desire, and it can be yours. :)

@ Leif, my friend, I can think of no other person who would manage to make an outstanding model of the boat, but do stay in your larger scale...I really think you should give it a go. If you want, I do have a set of plans for the ships boats that might be helpful in starting out. If you want, you can try it at a smaller scale too. :)

@ Oliver: you are right, my dear Sir, Constellation in Boston is actually an 1854 "newly" designed sloop of war, not the original frigate from the original frigates under the Act of 1794 which gave birth to the U.S. Navy. Mind you, a very beautiful ship, she is, but I think the Baltimore conservers have finally admitted the history of their ship is not what what originally claimed.

@ Jörg: It really pleases me that my little ship causes such wonderful memories for you. I have a very similar experience. For Father's day a few years ago my wife entered the lottery they have for the turn-about cruise they have in Charlestown every 4th of July...now, mind you, having a particular affection for this ship for many, many years, I have entered that lottery every year for the last ten or so years, and was never lucky enough to be chosen. My wife, however, in addition to entering the lottery apparently wrote to the Constitution crew and explained to them my love of this ship and, well, she of course got us two tickets as honored guests for that year's cruise. Well, you can imagine I was like a kid in a candy shop with a pocket full of money! I took quite a few pictures (adding to my already substantial collection), but of all sorts of details, and was floating a few feet off the ground for months! I don't know how to explain it, but this ship just brings out such emotions in those who are lucky enough to see her in person, and I am proud to admit I am one of them. She is truly a national treasure, whose importance is only enhanced when you begin to learn a bit more about her and her history. I have been doing that, on and off, for about 28 years now.

And that, my dear friends, is a part of why I love this ship and am so very happy to build this little model. My joy is heightened by your very kind words of encouragement and expressions of the delight in following my build thread. I do thank you all, and hope you continue to enjoy with me the fun I am having in building her.

Cheers!

Jim

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Sonntag, 21. Januar 2007, 05:43

Well, my friends, it's been a while ... quite a while, actually,... but, being New Year and all, I figured it was time to get back to my Constitution.
Actually, I have been looking up the rigging plan, just to be sure before I got into the masting and rigging. For now, however, I need to finish up the hammock nettings and the mizzen fife rail, before moving into the channels and masting.

So, I am continuing with the hammock netting. You might recall I was using a silk scarf I found in the Big Apple at a small Kiosk close to where I used to work. After finishing the port side forward netting I figured there was a quicker way to put the netting together.

I decided to use a wax paper covered card on which I drew parallel lines that matched the height of the finished netting. I also soaks some fly tying silk thread with PVA, which I used for the top and bottom lines of the netting. Here's a photo of the card set up with the netting in place with the glue soaked line on top and in place:



I also used some fine annealed steel wire for the hammock irons, just a matter of bending them into the right shape and gluing them to the top of the bulwarks. In this photo you can see the trimmed hammock netting and to the left is one of the hammock irons ready to be installed:



Here's the starboard side forward bulwark with the hammock irons glued in place:



This photo shows the netting glued in place...I thought using a white card would help show the netting better, but it didn't come out as clearly as I planned:



Here's the way it all ended up...I still have to touch up spots here and there, but it's pretty much done:



This view shows how the irons sit on the bulwark with the netting on each side:



And, a final view:



Before I work on the quarterdeck hammock nettings, I need to finish up the mizzen fife rail, otherwise I can expect the netting would be banged around a bit when working in and around the deck area...I hope to show the mizzen fiferail in the next installment.

Thanks for stopping by and having a look...I'll try and keep the delays between updates a bit shorter next time.:grin:

Cheers!
Jim

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Sonntag, 21. Januar 2007, 08:54

Jim,

just wonderful! But be honest - where did you get that pair of oversized tweezers?

Michael

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Sonntag, 21. Januar 2007, 17:22

Those look like medical tweazers to me. The ship looks beautiful! You got me thinking about doing one of those.... Well done!

-Ski

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Sonntag, 21. Januar 2007, 23:00

Good to see old Connie, and yourself, in such great shape! - Leif
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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Montag, 22. Januar 2007, 13:17

Wow, thanks so much, guys...I really appreciate the very kind comments! Those tweezers are a pair I picked up somewhere along the line, have had them for too many years that I care to remember. :D It does feel good to be working on her again, now that I've got a better idea of where I'm going with the rigging, for the most part....:roll:

Just a quick update to show what I was working on yesterday. I built up the mizzen fife rail, again using scaled down templates from a more accurate configuration I have. The kit has a simplified fife rail which is a bit out of proportion for the model and did not have enough locations for the belaying pins, so I built it up from scratch.

This is the scaled down fife railing which needs to have the holes drilled out for the belaying pins. I first poked the holes in the template using the pin drill, and then laminated the piece to another piece of card stock and, using the first series of holes, drilled down into the laminated piece. I then trimmed it to final shape.



Next, I created the pedestals using thin wire to which I glued some stock to create the top and bottoms; I found it easiest to glue the wire off of a strip of card, sandwiched with another strip on top, and did the same for the bottom. I then built up the middle using PVA glue, painted it when thoroughly dry and then trimmed them to shape:



I had to cut a number of small pieces of thin wire for the belaying pins; it's amazing how even the slightest difference in length shows up as oversized or undersized pins! So, I cut a whole bunch (the mizzen fife rail uses a total of around 23) and picked the best matched ones from the lot:



Then, I built up the forward parts, which are like knightheads with a iron cleat that runs athwartship about 1 mm from the top (again, using a pin drill for the hole and thin wire for the cleat), and glued it all together. I found coating the part with thinned out PVA made final touch-ups a bit easier with an emery board and judicious use of a hobby knife. I then added the belaying pins, which was an eye straining affair...I have an magnifying lens that clips to my reading glasses which really magnified the part well for this task...it was like seeing the parts in micro world! I find using slightly watered down PVA glue makes gluing these small parts a bit easier than glue straight from the container; the glue needs to seep into any spaces, like the holes for the belaying pins, and the raw glue just bunches up on the surface. I gave the finished part a few coats of thin paint...you have to be careful, when using acrylic paint, because the paper will soak up the paint and start to soften and deform if you apply it too heavy...you can see a bit of warping at the knighthead joints, but that will sort out when the part is glued to the deck. This last photo shows the almost finished piece...still needs a few touch ups on the pins but I wanted to let it dry very well before doing any more painting before installing it to the deck:



I need to first put in the mizzen mast footing, as it would be difficult to try and manuveur the piece into place with the fife rail blocking access to the area, so that's the next step....

Thanks again for stopping by and having a look!

Cheers!
Jim

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Montag, 22. Januar 2007, 18:42

I don't know what they're called in Europe, but we call these "wire gauge drills". I have a set of them myself - well, a diminished set - I snapped some of the tiny ones :rotwerd:

See here


Cheers,


Oliver
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  • In Vorbereitung: Ein echter "Publikumsliebling"
  • Meine Modelle sind unter http://www.waldenmodels.com/ zu bekommen!

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