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  • »treadhead1952« ist männlich
  • »treadhead1952« ist der Autor dieses Themas

Beiträge: 48

Registrierungsdatum: 22. Februar 2009

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Mittwoch, 4. März 2009, 20:46

Keep 'Em Sharp

Hi All,

Since I started cutting card and paper for models, one of the things that I have discovered is that constant use on our favorite materials takes a toll on the usual tools used for such things. Having discovered Excel and their fine line of hobby knives and blades, I am afraid the trusty old #11 Xacto knife is getting less use now. The Excel blades seem to be a bit sharper as well as a lot tougher, the points don't break as easily as the Xacto units do and they seem to last a bit better in constant use.

My favorite pair of medium sized scissors, Wiesse brand by name and stainless steel in construction have been in long use for decals and now see a lot of work with card and paper. They track well in a cut and if you lay the already cut section alongside the inner blade while cutting, a straight line is not a problem. Like most bladed things though, after a while they start to lose their edge. While I have a complete set of sharpening stones from white hard Arkansas to a very coarse grit type for sharpening knives from my collection as well as my trusty pocket knife. I found a handy tool that works quite well and whips that set of blades on the scissors into shape in just a few passes. The actual sharpening part is made from tungsten carbide with lots of plastic to protect the hands while in use. I am sure that there are many different types around but I found this one in a local dime store and for the $1.50 it costs, it is well worth that "major" investment.

Jay Massey
treadhead1952
Las Vegas, NV

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