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  • »Leif Ohlsson« ist der Autor dieses Themas

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Freitag, 25. Juli 2008, 20:39

Fauvel AV36 glider 1:33 by Philippe Rennesson

Just a month ago Philippe Rennesson added another superb 1:33 free download model of the Fauvel AV36 flying wing glider, at the French (with English translations) site "Maquette en cartons - Card models". Read more about it, and download it, from this page.

Philippe Rennesson has two earlier absolutely excellent models to his credit, the Pou du Ciel HM14 - Flying Flea, and the Dalotel D165. Both have been reviewed here on this site (see here and here).

The Fauvel comes with two pages of 3-view drawings, two pages of b&w parts for laminating, and three pages of coloured parts. In addition you can download instructions, and a parts list. Both of the latter are in French only. The model is marked "for experienced builders".

On the page for downloading, there is a link to a page full of construction photos. Philippe has also given an internet reference, which is highly readable in itself on all the Fauvel aircraft, and the AV36 in particular.

I attach four of Philippe's own photos of the build, plus a see-through drawing of the original from the reference page given. In the latter, note particularly the all wood-and-fabric construction, well suited for home- or club-building. I can't spot any tubular structure, apart from pushrods for ailerons, etc.

Note also the fact that the wings seem to be detachable just outside the airbrakes, just before the large ailerons (there's a challenge for the ambitious modeler; this would be entirely feasible to model!). The aircraft was obviously stored and transported at a right angle to what one would be used to with an ordinary glider.
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  • approche.jpg
  • differents_elements.jpg
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  • vue_de_dessus.jpg
  • av36_d1.gif
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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2

Freitag, 25. Juli 2008, 21:31

Reflections...

Stumbling through the French text on the reference page, I note that the prototyp is dated 1951, the wingspan was 11.95 meters, and empty weight an unbelievably low 120 kg! Yet it was rated for 12G at full weight of 215 kg (allowing 95 kg for pilot & misc.). The width disassembled was 2.38 m, which allowed it to be transported legally on ordinary roads with no restrictions.

Since the length assembled was 3.17m, perhaps the aircraft wasn't disassembled for transport after all; a slight angling might suffice to bring the width down to under 2.40m. Compare for this photo of an AV36 in its transport cradle:



The prototype was certified in France, Canada, and Germany, also for mild aerobatics. Minimum speed was 58 km/h and max speed 83 km/h. Best glide was 1:26 at 83 km/h, which is comparable to ordinary gliders of the era. Minimum sink speed was 0,87 m/s. From my gliding days I seem to remember the Ka8b would be in that neighbourhood (right Jan?). Numerous flights of 300 km and 500 km were registered by Fauvel AV36 glider pilots.

The AV36 was followed by the AV361, with slightly larger span and a more modern (laminary) wing profile, which increased best glide to 1:30 at 85 km/h, and a minimum sink speed of 0,74 m/s.

Several AV36 & AV361 were later modified by builders to carry a small two-stroke engine and a prop at the rear of the fuselage, between the fins. That would seem to be the dream of that era - build the aircraft in your garage (or perhaps better, club work shop), go gliding without having to be towed up, and - even better - get out of that impossible sink and return safely home, without having to call for a team and a truck from the middle of some god-forsaken cow pasture (yes, I've been there). Here's a photo:



That kind of luxury will cost you dearly today, in your brand new, hi-tech all plastic & glass fibre ship. But enough already with the reminiscing...
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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3

Samstag, 26. Juli 2008, 10:39

Details

Going through the photos of the Fauvel AV36 at Airliners.net, there are some interesting details:

+ The tow wire was divided into a kind of harness, with two attachment points, one on each side of the fuselage just below the canopy.

+ The glider was easily towed on ground with a small hand-cart. Compare for the practice on most glider fields today, where a dedicated car is required.

+ There is another example of a road-cart. The glider was apparently transported without detaching the wings.

+ Note also the wide variation of canopies, the use of wing end-plates on one version, and the new kind of wheeled under-carriage.

+ Finally, have a closer look at a couple of the towing photos - it appears that the pilot is actually deploying the air-brakes half-way while being winched aloft! I wonder whether that was standard practice, and if so, why...

For an ordinary glider, that would have meant disaster, if I remember it correctly. But perhaps it is a safety measure, to prevent the Fauvel to make one of those "incredibly tight loops" witnessed by Martin, while on tow! Perhaps that is also the reason for mounting the tow-wires so high, and so close to the wing.

Leif

PS. Due to the difficulties posed by Airliners.net I can't post the images directly, which is a nuisance. However, there's nothing preventing you from downloading the large images and saving them for that rainy day when you will finally consider building Philippe Rennesson's beatuifully designed model.

PPS. Philippe has kindly saved the models in a PDF format which allows you to open and edit them in a vector programme. This is a most commendable practice, since it means you can modify and recolour the model into any version you'd like without losing quality. I am dallying with the thought of making a wood-coloured model (although none may have existed), in order to make the most of the pretty pattern of plywood texture. So many ideas, so little "staying power" (as Wilfried would have put it).
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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Montag, 28. Juli 2008, 13:22

Hi Leif
The Fauvel has two air brake settings and the smaller angle can be set for launch. The glider then has nicer characteristics at take-off and becomes a little bit more stable during the launch procedure. The air brakes of the AV 36 are not coming out on both sides (upper and lower) of the wing, as can be seen at most gliders from this era, they are only acting on the lower wing side. Thus, they do not only produce drag but are also increasing lift, especially at the half-way-setting (20°).

Jan Hascher

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Montag, 28. Juli 2008, 14:17

Leif,
you are right about the comparison with the Ka8. In the previous post the airbrake-aituation was quite clearly explained. These types of flaps are called Fowler-Flaps. However it is also quite common to use a bit of conventional airbrakes during aerotow to keep the rope tight. The towing plane will lift off at higher speeds anyway, if its not an ultralight or a motorglider. I would not recommend it during winch launch though ;)

Cheers
Jan
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6

Montag, 28. Juli 2008, 14:22

You can also check out Michael Ohlweins page:
http://www.m-ohlwein.de/
This guy makes incredibly detailled RC-planes.
Actually he was the one who finished my grandpas last RC-plane. Granpa could only finish it 90% before he died. It's the JS Weihe here:
http://www.m-ohlwein.de/galinh_weihe.htm
It's build from Original Plans in scale down to the wing bolts. We had some effort in keeping Grandpa from making the pedals and stick actually work :)

Cheers
Jan
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Montag, 28. Juli 2008, 17:22

Thoughts on flaps vs. airbrakes

Hi Jan & Wasgutschmeckt (sic!), and thanks!

About the airbrakes, Philippe Rennesson has modeled what you say, airbrakes only on the underside. But they weren't Fowler flaps, were they? (I thought Fowler flaps were on the trailing edge, sort of increasing the wing area gradually, as well as changing the profile.)

[Yes, they are, check out Wikipedia: Flap (aircraft). For most gliders (and all vintage ones), we're not talking flaps, but airbrakes, which are spoilers, in fact destroying lift over a certain part of the wing, right?]

I accept the interesting fact (new thought to me!) that airbrakes on the underside of the wing might induce some apparent lift, since they would inflict a positive momentum forcing the glider towards a more nose-up position, much like very powerful trim rudders. On a winch start in particular, that might paradoxically be a good thing if applied only a little, since elevators might not be enough to induce the desirable sharp angle of ascent!

Several photos of other Fauvel versions, however, including the three-view above, show airbrakes also on the upper surface. As does the wonderful model by Michael Olwein. On these versions, applying airbrakes on tow (winch or otherwise) wouldn't be a particularly good idea, since they would decrease (destroy) overall lift, and be more or less neutral as to inducing a nose-up attitude.

I accept the point about increasing tow wire tension, and the need to do so momentarily on tow. But I also remember an incident were a Bergfalke on tow (not me piloting, although I've done other stupidities) started without noticing that the airbrakes were full out. The pilot of the tow plane had to make an emergency release of the glider on tow at low altitude, since the glider risked dragging him down completely, or stalling him beyond rescue. It resulted in a forced landing of the Bergfalke from low altitude and shook up the pilot and his passenger quite badly (no serious injuries, luckily, either to the two persons on board or the glider). Which is why I wondered.

The Weihe is absolutely beatiful, Jan, both in original and in the shape of your grandfather's model!

Looking through Michael Olwein's pages, I came across the L-Spatz (here and here):



I always considered that a prime subject for modeling, not least card modeling, since it hasn't got a single compound curve, not even the canopy. Any takers among you designers....?

Leif
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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Montag, 28. Juli 2008, 17:29

Files not easily editable

I should also say that the downloaded files are not so easy to edit in vector format as I first thought. They are clearly vector originals, and they do open in a vector programme - but the colour fields and shaded areas are sort of scanned, resulting in a horrendous amounts of paths and groups, quite unmanageable and very difficult to get rid of.

Any solutions? (Apart from appealing to the author of course...)

Leif
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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Montag, 28. Juli 2008, 17:39

Right, not Fowlerflaps. German word is Spreizklappe.
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Dienstag, 29. Juli 2008, 17:41

Leif,
there's one for sale:
http://www.av36.de/index.html
Once you got it, can I take a ride? :]

Cheers
Jan
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11

Sonntag, 3. August 2008, 16:38

Wonderful photos

Thanks, Jan!

Didn't see your last post until revisiting the thread to look for my own links. Wonderful stuff - beatiful photos plus a complete original 1957 "Betriebsanleitung" (handbook), with original three-views, and detailed drawings of couplings, rudder mechanisms, etc.

Go see for yourself (all ye that are interested):

D3662 for sale AV36C, built 1957, restored 1992, 66 hours total flight time!
http://www.av36.de/index.html

D3662 photo album
http://www.av36.de/bilder.html

D3662 download handbook & flight log
http://www.av36.de/betriebshandbuch.html

I attach a few tidbits, among them excellent views of the cockpit interior. Unfortunately, this aircraft is an AV36C, which makes it difficult to model (full-blown canopy, etc.). Note, however, the transport dolly, and the detachable nose!

Leif

PS. Jan, just noticed that Michael Ohlwein's Fauvel is an AV22 - a two-seater with a single fin (instead of the AV36, a single-seater with two fins). But your grandpa's Weihe is still as beautiful!
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  • 18-Three-view.jpg
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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12

Mittwoch, 1. Juli 2009, 16:17

About the airbrakes

Re-reading this thread, and having read the manual (link post immediately above), I now understand the workings of the airbrakes better. In the AV36 modeled here, as in several of the photos from airliners.net (link a couple of posts above), the aircrakes only work on the bottom side of the wing.

In the manual it says that the airbrakes actually provide increased lift (plus a small amount of braking) for the first part of its cycle of deployment. There is a special notch on the lever in the cockpit, marking the degree of deployment where more lift is produced.

Thus, it makes completely sense to deploy the airbrakes up to this point, when being winched up. It would make less sense, the way I think, to deploy them to the same degree when being towed, since that would make the problem of wire tensioning worse (lifting above the tug means having to dive, which means even less line tensioning).

The manual (from 1957) says that you will have to accept less of line tension when towing in the Fauvel, due to the aircraft being so light. For the same reason, the Fauvel is cleared for use with light tow-planes, like the Piper Cub.

More interestingly, you are very severly warned NOT to detract the airbrakes all the way, when on final and close to the ground, since pulling them all the way in would mean loss of lift, and risk of stalling. This is the main reason for there being a notch or mark in the airbrake lever. You should not detract (pull in) the airbrakes beyond this point when on final.

Incidentally, the Fauvel had very nice stalling characteristics. If I read the manual right, you could pull the stick all the way back for a sort of mushing descent. When the stick is returned to normal position, regular flight characteristics are quickly returned.

The Fauvel was also cleared for mild aerobatics (loops, slips, chandelles), but not for inverted flight, since the elevator did not have enough authority to maintain inverted flight in an attitude where overspeeding was not a risk.

Leif
Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

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13

Montag, 28. Februar 2011, 18:26

The Fauvel AV36 in wood & fabric texture - download a complete kit

It has been two and a half years now since this thread was opened, and a year and a half since I last visited. Periodically during that interval, off an on, I have been working on a method to create a convincing way of replicating natural wood & fabric textures in making paper models of aircraft. The learning process was documented in this thread over at Papermodelers.com.

Now I have finally pulled myself together and made a kit of all those wood & fabric textured parts. Philip Renesson's Fauvel AV36 has been recreated in a 1/16 scale wood & fabric kit - although it is still all in paper.

In the downloads section of this site, there now resides - with the help of Jan Hascher - a complete 1/16 scale kit of the Fauvel AV36 in resplendent wood & fabric textures, with just a touch of decorative dark red. See the attached mockup of the wing skin for an illustration.

This is a rescaled, recoloured, and edited version of the original 1/33 scale model by Philippe Rennesson, published with his permission. As such it is not a scale model, since the modeled aircraft F-CBRO probably never existed in a (non-)paint scheme like this. Basically I have "peeled off" all white & red exterior paint (except a strip of red at the wing leading edge and center section), as well as all the green of the interior, in order to be able to display the underlying wood and fabric structure.

1/16 scale is more than double the original 1/33 scale, and I believe it is a scale that pays real justice to the quality of modern paper model designs. In spite of its size (75cm span), the model has been edited to fit into a page size that will print equally well on A4 and US Letter size papers, as well as all laser & inkjet printers.

This has been accomplished by dividing up the wing and centre section parts. They should be glued together again with the help of the supplied glue strips before they are applied to their respective frameworks (see more detailed instructions when you get to these parts).

Suggested paper thickness is 200g (ca 0.25mm thick). This is slightly thicker than normal paper-model standard.

The model comes as a single 21-page pdf-file. The weight of this file is some 45 Mb which goes some way to indicate the high resolution of the textures. I invite you to check out the complete 1/16 scale kit!

Philippe Rennesson's original 1/33 Fauvel AV36 can be downloaded from: http://pierreg.free.fr/carton/extra/av36phil/av36.htm . You may also want to check out his other models, at: http://criquet.over-blog.com/ , among them his recent beautiful Caudron Aiglon.

Finally, for those who cannot abide anything but the regular 1/33 scale, it so happens that original designer Philippe Rennesson wished for a personal 1/33 scale copy of his Fauvel AV36 in wood & fabric textures. So I did that, and you can have it as well.

If you download the 1/33 version, you will find that it is nothing but a simple 48.5 percent reduction of the big 1/16 scale model, with four of those pages on each of the 1/33 scale pages. The 1/33 scale pdf version is five pages and weighs in below 10 Mb.
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Dankbar für die Gelegenheit auf Englisch schreiben zu dürfen, kann aber Antworten problemlos auf Deutsch lesen.

Dieser Beitrag wurde bereits 5 mal editiert, zuletzt von »Leif Ohlsson« (1. März 2011, 07:59)


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Montag, 28. Februar 2011, 18:50

Hello Leif,

your graphics are really a piece of art! Great!

Greetings
Bernhard

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Montag, 28. Februar 2011, 19:43

Segler

Hallo Leif,

herzlichen Dank für deine Arbeit.

Viele Grüße,
Roman
LG Roman

René Pinos

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Montag, 28. Februar 2011, 23:32

Vielen Dank Leif,

für diesen feinen Bausatz, aber mehr noch freut es mich wieder von Dir zu hören.

Ich habe mir schon einen Ausdruck gemacht und nehem ihn schon einmal nach Wien zur GoMo mit.

Servus
René
Jede Entscheidung ist der Tod für Milliarden von Möglichkeiten.

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